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BUFFALO Search Results: “settlement”

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Rethinking Resettlement

BY ERKIN ÖZAY
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"How can we make our endeavors clear and approachable enough that we can actually contribute to the public debate at a very high level?"

In Rethinking Resettlement from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University at Buffalo, Erkin Özay, reviews some of the social and design issues involved in rehousing and supporting Buffalo, New York's new Americans. Özay's Spring 2016 UB graduate studio explored the potential for temporary and long-term housing for newly arrived refugees and immigrants, as well as the role of supporting institutions, community assets, and reimagining the existing housing stock. Özay's project investigates "compassionate urbanism." He is interested in how groups of limited means--new and existing residents--support each other through careful intersections. 

 

SITEWIDE Search Results: “settlement”

Employment Solicitors London - Settlement Agreements
Solicitors London, Settlement Agreements in Reading, Berkshire
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How New Immigrants Could Build Their New City

BY AMITIS NOUROOZI
@ VOL 10 ON JAN 22, 2016

Within the architecture field, Amitis Nouroozi works in the intersection of planning, design and community-building. She shares her story, as a new immigrant, who is building her new home in the first years of immigration to Canada.

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A Bird's Eye View of Kenya

BY AMIT RAMRAKHA
@ VOL 8 ON MAR 20, 2016

Amit Ramrakha takes us on a journey of aerial photography though the North of Kenya to Nairobi.. wildlife, rivers, animals.. to civilization of human settlement...

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Urban Permaculture

BY DE BOER JESSIE
@ VOL 10 ON APR 08, 2016

Jessie De Boer, with Ivan and Sven founded Berefoot Solutions proposing permaculture solutions in different sites across Kenya.

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A Day Behind the Music

BY SARAH GARCIA
@ VOL 4 ON AUG 11, 2016

Sarah Garcia consistently heard the comment, “You have the coolest job in the world!” so she decided to show people “A Day Behind the Music” and let them judge the coolness of her job in the music industry for themselves. From the early rise at 5:00 a.m. to the construction and deconstruction of a stage in less than 16 hours, and the catering, the security, the union labor, the heavy equipment, and the pyrotechnics, and finally from the settlement of the contract to the late departure, exhausted at 2:00 a.m. the following morning, Sarah Garcia shows us the real reasons she loves her job.

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Exploring Ҫatalhöyük: A Neolithic Settlement.

BY IZZY BARTLEY
@ VOL 11 ON SEP 29, 2016

An overview of the archaeological dig at the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Ҫatalhöyük, a Neolithic settlement in Turkey.  This overview by presenter Izzy Bartley introduces the two main dig sites and explains how finds from the excavation have been used to decipher how the people of this settlement lived 9000 years ago.   

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agriCULTURE in Rwanda

BY JANET NIYONKURU
@ AGRICULTURE: FOOD WITHOUT BORDERS ON MAR 11, 2017

Janet M. Niyonkuru was born in Rwanda, 1972; And her parent were farmers. The money they paid for her high school was from what they produced. She left her country in 1994 to the refugee camp in Tanzania. Then in 2000, she moved to Uganda refugee camp; where she spent 7 years and then she resettled to Canada ;where she calls her new home. She has an 11 and 11 months daughter. And she is maried to a Burndian. She lives in Halifax where she goes to SMU and she works  part time for ISNS as an interpreter, Life Skills Support worker and Oncal settlement Suport worker. And she loves God.

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Bitcoin: Down The Rabbit Hole

BY ADAM HENNESSY
@ VOL 7 ON MAY 25, 2017

In 2009, a programmer or group of programmer, under the name Satoshi Nakamoto, presented to the world a worldwide cryptocurrency and digital payment system—a solution to frictionless settlement that has the power to change money as the world knows it. Adam Hennessy, a pioneer in the cryptocurrency arena and a Bitcoin “miner,” explores the components of cryptocurrency as he seeks to spark curiosity and perhaps even some “digital-gold fever” with this primer about Bitcoin.

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Doinaka

Doinaka (ド田舎) is the Japanese word used to refer to a very rural location; i.e. the countryside, the boondocks, or the sticks. In this edition of Presentation of the Day (from PKN Tokyo Vol. 76, in Japanese and English), Satoko Maeda takes us to the countryside of Nagano Prefecture, Otanimura to a little village called Ooami and tells us stories by way of her lively photographs. Satoko -- or Sakko, as she calls herself -- moved to this little settlement of 60 people (most of which are men and women above the age of 70) about 5 or 6 years ago from Japan's northernmost island, Hokkaido. The residents of Ooami are real salt-of-the-earth folk; they till their land, grow their own vegetables, and share in the yield.  Through her photographs, Satoko documents the transformative power of the seasons -- from celebrating with traditional festivals in the summer, harvesting crops in autumn, keeping the snow at bay in winter, to watching the multi-colored blossoms emerge in Spring -- and how it changes this little community's day to day life.  For Satoko these images are not only an extension of her life experiences in the inaka, but convey the warmth of her feelings as well. To really get a sense of what inaka life is like, you'll have to give this presentation a look, or check out Satoko's Doinaka Nikki (or, "Countryside Journal") to see what she's up to these days. 

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Re-Thinking Maps and Mapping

By Jess Dunkin, On the Land Programs Consultant, NWT Recreation and Parks Association In late May, the NWT Recreation and Parks Association (NWTRPA) and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) co-hosted the second of four PechaKucha Nights slated to happen in Yellowknife this year. The theme of this evening was Maps and Mapping, a topic which clearly resonated with Yellowknifers, as once again we had to add seats at the last minute! You can read about the first PechaKucha here. Maps are more than tools for navigation. They are also rich historical and cultural objects that tell us something about how we see the world. This makes them ripe for analysis and reflection, a fact that was amply demonstrated by the evening’s six presenters. MC Mike Mitchell introducing the evening (Photo: NWTRPA) The PechaKucha opened with a funny and thoughtful introduction by the snappily dressed MC for the evening Mike Mitchell. With a hand full of well-worn maps from his travels in British Columbia, South America, and the NWT, Mike demonstrated how maps remind us of journeys taken, people encountered, and experiences had. The first presenter was Yellowknife-based photographer Fran Hurcomb, who spent her 6 minutes and 40 seconds “unrolling” what might be the country’s longest map: a 128-foot long map of the Dehcho (Mackenzie River). After explaining how the map was used by boat captains navigating Canada’s longest river, we journeyed with Fran, her partner Dave, and their daughter from Hay River to Inuvik. This trip formed the basis for an exhibition at the museum a few years ago that linked archival photographs and her own images to points on the map. (Photo: Fran Hurcomb) The second presentation, which was delivered bySteve Schwarz, transported those gathered at the museum, from the NWT’s waterways to the skyways. Steve, a remote sensing analyst with the GNWT, demonstrated how satellite images and aerial photographs can help us to map, monitor, and better understand landscape change from forest fires in the Tłı̨chǫ to shoreline erosion on the Arctic Coast to slumps in the Gwich’in Settlement Area. Steve was followed by Rajiv Rawat, a mapmaker and media/tech specialist at the PWNHC with an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of the fantasy genre. Rajiv wowed the audience with his engaging analysis of maps and representations of the North in fantasy literature, films, and television shows. From the fourth presenter, Ingrid Kritsch, Research Director of the Gwich’in Tribal Council Department of Cultural Heritage (formerly the Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute), we learned the story behind the Gwich’in Place Names project. Since 1992, the GTC has worked with elders and knowledge holders to gather information about named places in the Gwich’in Settlement Region. This information has formed the backbone of the Gwich’in Place Names Digital Atlas and a series of place-name maps produced by the GTC. Simon Whitehouse with the Rand McNally Geo-Physical Globe (Photo: Simon Whitehouse) Next, local journalist Simon Whitehouse reported on research he conducted while a graduate student into the history of the Rand McNally Geo-Physical Earth Globes. Long before the crew of Apollo 8 photographed the earth from space, these large globes (they measured six feet in diameter and weighed more than 400lbs!) allowed Americans to see a realistic interpretation of the world they inhabited. Simon also demonstrated how the globes captured advancements in various postwar sciences including geology, cartography, ecology, and space science. The evening’s final presenter was Tom Andrews. Before he accepted a position as an archaeologist with the GNWT, Tom worked for the Dene Nation on the Dene Mapping Project, a traditional land use and occupancy survey of Denendeh. The project team worked with 600 Dene and Metis trappers to document their land use on large maps. What is less well-know about the project is the long and tedious process of computerizing the information gathered during the many interviews, something that become abundantly clear during after Tom’s presentation. The Mapping Project has inspired and furnished data for other regional mapping project including the Sahtu Atlas and the aforementioned Gwich’in Place Names Atlas. Pop-up exhibit on maps and mapping (Photo: NWTRPA) In addition to the six presentations, the night featured a pop-up exhibit about maps and mapping that included a map roller used on board the CCGS Tembah, panels from the Gwich’in Place Names project, Bonnie Fournier’s art maps, and information about a mapping project graduate student Amanda DeGray is undertaking with the Yellowkives Dene. Bonnie Fournier with her art maps (Photo: NWTRPA) Arctic Tern furnished the presenters with maps as thanks for all of their hardwork. If you missed the event, some of the presentations are available here.