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PAST Czech Science Centres powered by Pecha Kucha

Olomouc @ Arigone - vinárna
Apr 16, 2014

PAST PechaKucha Night Futurenauts

Wellington @ Hannah Playhouse
May 18, 2014

PAST VOL 27

Honolulu @ Honolulu Museum of Art Spalding House
Jun 10, 2016

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The Stories of Rocks

BY PATRICK JOHNSTONE
@ VOL 2 ON APR 26, 2013

Geologist Patrick Johnstone shares with us his passion; rocks. Studying trace fossils, Johnstone can infer the behavior and the enviornments of ancient species, and uses that knowledge gather more information. Using tools and evidence developed by science over the years, he can tell the stories of the rocks that he studies. 

"Presentation of the Day" on July 2, 2013.

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The Volcanos in Our Backyard

BY ALASTAIR JAMIESON
@ PKN_AKL_SPECIAL EDITION ON MAR 28, 2014

"Auckland's pretty unique, its the only city in the world build on a volcanic field of it's kind."

In The Volcanos in Our Backyard from PechaKucha Night Auckland Special Edition, Ecologist and photographer Alastair Jamieson speaks on the numerous volcanoes that make up the urban and suburban landscapes of Auckland, as well as how the results of their eruptions have benefited the community over the years. 

This was "Presentation of the Day" on July 25th, 2017.  

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Feuer und Flamme – für Vulkane

BY IRENE SARTORIS
@ VOL 3 ON NOV 29, 2013

Feurig wird es bei dem Vortrag von Irene Sartoris. Sie ist Leiterin des Vulkan-Hauses Strohn, Natur- und Geopark-Führerin sowie Gästeführerin durch die Eifel. Sie erzählt über Feuerberge, Maare, Magma und Co.

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Reproducing Spanish Royalty

BY MICHELLE VAUGHAN
@ VOL 6 ON JUN 05, 2014

Artist Michelle Vaughan discusses copies, genetics, history, and portait paintings. She goes into depth on the portraits Diego Velazquez was commissioned to create of the family of Spanish King Philip IV -- a family notorious for in-breeding. Michelle has created digital works of art that tell stories about the nature of replication, family genetics, and painterly techniques.

"Presentation of the Day" on August 12, 2014. 

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Lava Flows

BY SCOTT ROWLAND
@ VOL 22 ON DEC 12, 2014

Scott Rowland gained his love for the outdoors from the Hawai‘i Service Trip Program, and in college was happy to find a major (Geology & Geophysics) that involved being outdoors. He has been researching and teaching about lava flows at UH for more years than he wants to think about, but never tires of seeing them, flowing or not, in the field.

"Presentation of the Day" on February 11, 2015.

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Things I Like about Surfing that are Not Surfing

BY MARK GRIVETTI
@ VOL 13 ON FEB 25, 2015

Mark Grivetti has a lifelong love of nature that manifests in many ways. After growing up rockhounding as a child he became a geologist and has been lucky enough to work around the world on landslides, faults, groundwater and all things geological. Whenever he can, he likes to get to the beach with friends and family and spend time in the water.

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Fragment of Time and the Hands of the Makers

BY PIERRE BIDAUD
@ VOL 4 ON APR 05, 2016

Listen as Pierre Bidaud guides us on a walk through time with rock and stone. Let the the hands of stonemason be your guide.

 

 

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Iceland: Between Fire & Ice

BY DAVID RAMSAY
@ VOL 7 ON NOV 01, 2016

"He's looking into the abyss, He's looking into himself.."

In Iceland: Between Fire & Ice at PechaKucha Night Cambridge Vol.7,  David Ramsay reflects on the shifting landscape of Iceland as the once frozen land begins to thaw and divide. What lures him to dive into the freezing cold abyss of the freshwater fissures? What will he discover about this rarely traversed frozen tundra? Watch and find out.

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Lessons from natural history of California

BY CARLI BAKER
@ VOL 27 ON APR 20, 2017

Carli  Baker talks about what we can learn from the past to help us solve problems in the future. She takes us on a journey through breath-taking views of California, explaining how the sunny state came to be.

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One Family's Memories: 100 years of our Dayton Stories

BY HEATHER SCHIEMAN
@ VOL 36 ON SEP 13, 2018

Heather Schieman the last in Dayton to bare her family name, is a 5th generation Daytonian who has a strong love of this city, not only for what it is today, but for its rich history and past.  A resident of South Park, employee of UD, and frequent visitor of Ghostlight and Warped Wing, Heather is constantly creating her own Dayton stories just a stones throw away from where her family's story first began.  

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Hermosillo Night #2

Hermosillo, Sonora, México. October 10, 2013. With double the assistance and double the fun, Hermosillo presented its second PechaKucha Night at the mecca of indie/local music "Backroom". Mexican sculptor Enrique Aviléz was the first presenter on stage and took us around his life-long journey of working with stone, copper, several types of clay, glass, wood and any other material that will help in the execution of his multiple ideas influenced entirely by the local culture. Enrique shared with us an interesting point of view: he believes the name of the streets in a city shapes its identity, just like certain features define us as a human being. Find more about Enrique here. Graphic designer and photographer Alejo Gastélum invited us to witness his collection of Art Toys, inspired by a well-known toy brand. He showed a passion for geometric shapes and optical illusions and his experience and thoughts about working with logotypes and branding for local businesses. Find more about Alejo here. Following the format and taking advantage of it, Desierto Indie gave us a packed-full of ideas presentation. Their project consists of documenting local gigs and cultural events with videos and photographs but the core idea behind it is allowing the future generations consult this sort of "gig/event library" to let them know how cool Hermosillo's music scene "was" in 2013. Their motivation also consists on expanding the art variety in the city and creating a historic archive of the current art movement. Surf Desierto Indie's library here. Next to Desierto Indie, David Norzagaray captivated the crowd with such interesting project which consists on producing music to use as therapy for disabled people. All of this, fusioned with his passion for Mexico and most of all, the northern Mexico's chords of the Sonoran desert. David's most recent execution includes a music album for kids with lyrics completely inspired by universal literature. Find more about David's work here. Speaking of captivating, Daniel Ríos showed us the massive influence on todays creative processes and its results from a speedy technology development perspective. How different the art-creating life was back then where videos were literally 'cut' and 'glued' back together and how simple it is today by just tapping a few times on a super-clear display and upload it anywhere within minutes. Find more about Daniel here. Miguel Franco's presentation was as brilliant as his cinematography career. His experience has given him plenty of emotions and character including probably the most important: perseverance and stepping out of the comfort zone. Miguel told us how film has been his dream since he was a kid and all the trouble and happiness this has brought to him including a few career-threatening accidents. Find more about Miguel here. Mexican fashion designer Isa Valdéz shared with us her creative process inside the fashion/textile business and the different ways she chooses to come up with a method to execute an idea and the mysterious places she can get into, obtaining as a result always three ideas at once. She compares it to solving a puzzle. Her main goal is creating an emotion in her and the spectator at once. This way, Isa feels she connects with the world, being her little daughter a fundamental part of her motor. Find more about Isa here. Carlos Iván was one of those extra-interesting presenters. He photographs abandoned houses, cars, towns and all sort of situations that tell a story to his camera lens. Carlos perspective certainly showed us through his pictures the beauty of isolated objects, almost as if they were beautiful sculptures in the middle of nowhere narrating a charming tale. Find more about Carlos here. After a successful beer break, Miriam Salado was kind enough to explain from top to bottom, the meticulous process of building an art exhibition. Her paintings, part of "Muerte y Gloria (Death and Glory)" show the heavy influence of mexican-american cultures in clothing, habits and the new ways of living and gave Miriam a second place in the 8th Visual Art Biennale of Sonora. Find more about Miriam here. "Sin Llorar (No crying)" consists of a determined couple of local artists who came to revolutionize the custom tattoo industry in the community with their high-quality custom art. They shared with us the complexity of the process and the hard work it requires to usually compress a lot of feelings onto one little graphic on the customer's skin. Be brave and make an appointment here. Fernando Valles a local TV host, gave us an insight on rustic to modern video-making, the television life and the long ride he has experienced with "Video Track", a tv show aimed at young visual art enthusiasts. Find more about Fernando and Video Track here. Our next presenter was the shocking moment of the night. Mexican radio/voice-creative César Parra amazed us with his broad experience with radio, jingles and advertising. He has provided professional voice services for Pepsi and other famous brands. We all cheered and squeaked in happiness the very moment he started performing the voice of several Thundercats characters (cartoon) on stage as he worked in the project back then. We were so astonished by his presentation that none of us remembered to snap a pic. :( Find more about Cesar here. Our next presenter Keops took the stage and taught us about the importance of co-working and the amazing results it produces. His presentation included a well resumed list of benefits from working along with other creative people and how far and big a project can turn with just the right combination of people, all started with just a simple idea. Find more about Keops here. Sergio Durón was one of our last presenters but managed to keep our already tipsy heads with his clever work. His broad graphic design experience involves several local communities, being the most famous "Bikes & Beers" where the Hermosillo bike enthusiasts gather at a certain landmark, travel for a few kilometers and finish at a bar having a couple of beers and sharing the fandom. Find more about Sergio here. Our last presenter Javier Quiñonez gave us a tour around the geology of the city. Being the "Cerro de la Campana (Bell Hill)" one of the most important landmarks in the city, he taught us about the resonancy of the rocks surrounding said landmark, therefore the name of the famous hill that can be seen almost from every point in Hermosillo on a clear day. Find more of Javier here.  Thanks again to PechaKucha in Tokyo for letting us hold the event in Hermosillo and being part of the Global Night that we enjoyed so much. We would also like to thank Backroom for letting us host the event in this venue. -Elizabeth Torres         Photos by: Carolina Fierros and E. Torres.  

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Lava Flows

“Hawaiian eruptions sometimes produce these spectacular fountains…” Specialist in Geology and Geophysics Scott Rowland has a hot, incandescent love for lava. In “Lava Flows” from PKN Honolulu Vol. 22 he speaks about his research he’s done on both fresh flows and and older volcanos, and how lava has affected the residents of the Hawaiian islands.

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Artistic Encounters with Plastiglomerate, Derelict Fishing Gear, and other Pacific Plastic Flotsam

“He mimes geological compression, squeezing all of the detritus together to make a post-consumerist stone.” In Artistic Encounters with Plastiglomerate, Derelict Fishing Gear, and other Pacific Plastic Flotsam from PechaKucha Night Honolulu Vol. 27, Jan Dickey, UHM MFA candidate, and Jaimey Hamilton Faris, UHM Associate Professor of Contemporary Art and Critical Theory, will talk about how art engages with the environmental impact of plastic trash in the Pacific Ocean. They will introduce the work of three artists: Kelly Jazvac’s “readymade” plastiglomerate (a newly designated geologic formation of sand, coral, and plastic); Maika’i Tubbs’ attempts to replicate platiglomerate’s geology; and Mary Babcock’s weavings of plastic fishing line found on the shores of the Hawaiian Islands.

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Re-Thinking Maps and Mapping

By Jess Dunkin, On the Land Programs Consultant, NWT Recreation and Parks Association In late May, the NWT Recreation and Parks Association (NWTRPA) and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) co-hosted the second of four PechaKucha Nights slated to happen in Yellowknife this year. The theme of this evening was Maps and Mapping, a topic which clearly resonated with Yellowknifers, as once again we had to add seats at the last minute! You can read about the first PechaKucha here. Maps are more than tools for navigation. They are also rich historical and cultural objects that tell us something about how we see the world. This makes them ripe for analysis and reflection, a fact that was amply demonstrated by the evening’s six presenters. MC Mike Mitchell introducing the evening (Photo: NWTRPA) The PechaKucha opened with a funny and thoughtful introduction by the snappily dressed MC for the evening Mike Mitchell. With a hand full of well-worn maps from his travels in British Columbia, South America, and the NWT, Mike demonstrated how maps remind us of journeys taken, people encountered, and experiences had. The first presenter was Yellowknife-based photographer Fran Hurcomb, who spent her 6 minutes and 40 seconds “unrolling” what might be the country’s longest map: a 128-foot long map of the Dehcho (Mackenzie River). After explaining how the map was used by boat captains navigating Canada’s longest river, we journeyed with Fran, her partner Dave, and their daughter from Hay River to Inuvik. This trip formed the basis for an exhibition at the museum a few years ago that linked archival photographs and her own images to points on the map. (Photo: Fran Hurcomb) The second presentation, which was delivered bySteve Schwarz, transported those gathered at the museum, from the NWT’s waterways to the skyways. Steve, a remote sensing analyst with the GNWT, demonstrated how satellite images and aerial photographs can help us to map, monitor, and better understand landscape change from forest fires in the Tłı̨chǫ to shoreline erosion on the Arctic Coast to slumps in the Gwich’in Settlement Area. Steve was followed by Rajiv Rawat, a mapmaker and media/tech specialist at the PWNHC with an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of the fantasy genre. Rajiv wowed the audience with his engaging analysis of maps and representations of the North in fantasy literature, films, and television shows. From the fourth presenter, Ingrid Kritsch, Research Director of the Gwich’in Tribal Council Department of Cultural Heritage (formerly the Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute), we learned the story behind the Gwich’in Place Names project. Since 1992, the GTC has worked with elders and knowledge holders to gather information about named places in the Gwich’in Settlement Region. This information has formed the backbone of the Gwich’in Place Names Digital Atlas and a series of place-name maps produced by the GTC. Simon Whitehouse with the Rand McNally Geo-Physical Globe (Photo: Simon Whitehouse) Next, local journalist Simon Whitehouse reported on research he conducted while a graduate student into the history of the Rand McNally Geo-Physical Earth Globes. Long before the crew of Apollo 8 photographed the earth from space, these large globes (they measured six feet in diameter and weighed more than 400lbs!) allowed Americans to see a realistic interpretation of the world they inhabited. Simon also demonstrated how the globes captured advancements in various postwar sciences including geology, cartography, ecology, and space science. The evening’s final presenter was Tom Andrews. Before he accepted a position as an archaeologist with the GNWT, Tom worked for the Dene Nation on the Dene Mapping Project, a traditional land use and occupancy survey of Denendeh. The project team worked with 600 Dene and Metis trappers to document their land use on large maps. What is less well-know about the project is the long and tedious process of computerizing the information gathered during the many interviews, something that become abundantly clear during after Tom’s presentation. The Mapping Project has inspired and furnished data for other regional mapping project including the Sahtu Atlas and the aforementioned Gwich’in Place Names Atlas. Pop-up exhibit on maps and mapping (Photo: NWTRPA) In addition to the six presentations, the night featured a pop-up exhibit about maps and mapping that included a map roller used on board the CCGS Tembah, panels from the Gwich’in Place Names project, Bonnie Fournier’s art maps, and information about a mapping project graduate student Amanda DeGray is undertaking with the Yellowkives Dene. Bonnie Fournier with her art maps (Photo: NWTRPA) Arctic Tern furnished the presenters with maps as thanks for all of their hardwork. If you missed the event, some of the presentations are available here.