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PechaKucha Presentation

Incremental Development and the Future of the City

PRESENTED ON JUN 06, 2017
IN BRYAN @ VOL 11

So much of the real estate industry is extractive, where far-away investors mine the value from properties that line our streets. We are working toward a more generative real estate model, where local people can invest in their own neighborhoods and in that process, create new life and value that benefits their community. The kind of places we want to live in are built and maintained by people who really love them.

 

However, even beloved and successful places are at risk. We all know stories of boom and bust. Buildings, neighborhoods, cities are all put under great stress in times of fast economic change, whether growth or decline. At the local level, the best way we know to protect against the negative impacts of both growth and decline is this: spread the risk and the reward. We need more neighborhood-based small developers creating buildings that can adapt in times of trouble.

 

Scale makes all the difference. The small-scale developer is limited by their size to a certain scope of project. They don’t have the team or the resources for mega-developments; they need to stick with small, simple buildings in a fairly concentrated area so they can easily keep an eye on things. Instead of large apartment blocks or a subdivision of single-family homes, small developers are more likely to build duplexes, triplexes, quadplexes, live-work buildings, backyard cottages etc.—perfect for adapting neighborhoods on a lot-by-lot basis.These buildings are too small for a conventional developer whose profits depend on an economy of scale. Small developers depend on economies of resourcefulness and relationships, and that economic model is what makes small developers so adaptable in times of trouble.

 

This country is covered with inspiring precedents of buildings that punch above their weight, giving back to the city through taxes, to the neighborhood through street appeal, and to the owner through a positive cash flow. Across the country, communities are realizing that big developers cannot be induced to come build the neighborhoods they want. No one is coming to save them from the status quo. They’ve got to do it themselves.

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The Future: Thinking About Design

BY KATIE HILL
@ VOL 5 ON MAY 19, 2010

Katie Hill and her presentation "The Future: Thinking About Design," recorded at PKN Leeds Vol. 5 earlier this year.

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City Urban Planning in Genoa

BY BEATRICE MORETTI
@ VOL 1 ON FEB 26, 2012

Beatrice Moretti and Paola Sabbion are architects from URBAN LAB. In this presentation, they cover a project called the new City Urban Planning.
 The project involved the announcement of the Genoa Urban Plan 2010 through the publication of the Urban Lab Notebooks, and the staging of the exhibition "Genoa Today, Genoa Tomorrow" in December 2011, an extraordinary instrument of participation and opportunity for discussion. (in Italian)

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Imaginative Planning

BY HEATHER TERNOWAY
@ VOL 13 ON MAR 06, 2013

Heather Ternoway is an urban planner committed to making planning more tangible and exciting. For over a decade, she has worked with communities large and small to improve quality of life through creative community-driven planning and design. 

 
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Transit Design

BY JEFF DOBLE
@ VOL 28 ON JUN 13, 2013

Jeff Doble is an architecht and designer, and has always loved urban design and planning. Here he tells us about two of his projects, in both Vancouver and Riyadh, and the factors that go into planning and designing each station in order to encourage more people to use public transit. 

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Readjusting For The Future

BY FELIPE FRANCISCO DE SOUZA
@ VOL 105 ON JUL 31, 2013

Felipe Francisco De Souza speaks about urban development in a country with as many special circumstances as Japan. He also explains the historical background of its contemporary planning system, the effect that land readjustment has on Japan's future and its influence for the international agenda.

"Presentation of the Day" on August 10, 2013.

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City Development

BY MATTHEW QUINN
@ MADE IN LONDON ON SEP 17, 2014

Matthew Quinn is the director of Pipers Design, an architecture firm focused on the development of the city. His firm additionally encourages people to use technology to learn and understand where and how city planning/development works. As Matthew moved around from America to Rome to London, he states that he has learned that it's best to work on the quality of one’s content.

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How New Immigrants Could Build Their New City

BY AMITIS NOUROOZI
@ VOL 10 ON JAN 22, 2016

Within the architecture field, Amitis Nouroozi works in the intersection of planning, design and community-building. She shares her story, as a new immigrant, who is building her new home in the first years of immigration to Canada.

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Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78

BY FRANK PALEN, ESQ., AICP
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

“Think of me as a time traveler. I’m going to take you back to a place called Buffalo in the 1970s.”

In Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78 from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, attorney and urban renewal advocate, Frank Palen, recalls the creation of a historic district for theatre and culture from a once abandoned rust belt urban core. From 1977 to 1979, Palen was Research Associate in the Center for Community Research and Development at the University at Buffalo’s School of Architecture and Environmental Design, serving as Coordinator of the Buffalo Entertainment District Project. The University at Buffalo’s graduate studio investigated the potential of promoting a theater district in what was then an increasingly abandoned section of Downtown, despite various setbacks and a challenging political climate. The result was a very high-profile effort that set an agenda for the redevelopment of Buffalo that continues today.

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Rivers Are Our Future Landscapes

BY JOSH ELLIS
@ VOL 41 ON MAR 07, 2017

Josh Ellis of the Metropolitan Planning Council (MPC) talks about how the Chicago River is being brought back to life, with magnificent repercussions for life in the city, the communities and habitats on its shores,