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PechaKucha Presentation

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Jo Atherton

Artist , Self Employed in Harrold

Flotsam Weaving

PRESENTED ON JUN 05, 2014
IN BEDFORD @ VOL 2

Artist Jo Atherton weaves artwork from flotsam found washed up on beaches. Their cheerful familiar forms belie a shocking truth: we get older but plastic remains.

"Presentation of the Day" on July 21, 2014.

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Contemporary Maori Art Forms

BY NATASHA PERKINS
@ VOL 108 ON NOV 06, 2013

Natasha Perkins and her team created a structure and is inspired by the New Zealand Maori practice of weaving.. Their structure is recyclable and was created using interlocking pieces, and was meant to be a place of thought, inspiration. Watch to see how they did it.

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Artistic Encounters with Plastiglomerate, Derelict Fishing Gear, and other Pacific Plastic Flotsam

BY JAIMEY HAMILTON FARIS
@ VOL 27 ON JUN 10, 2016

“He mimes geological compression, squeezing all of the detritus together to make a post-consumerist stone.”

In Artistic Encounters with Plastiglomerate, Derelict Fishing Gear, and other Pacific Plastic Flotsam from PechaKucha Night Honolulu Vol. 27, Jan Dickey, UHM MFA candidate, and Jaimey Hamilton Faris, UHM Associate Professor of Contemporary Art and Critical Theory, will talk about how art engages with the environmental impact of plastic trash in the Pacific Ocean. They will introduce the work of three artists: Kelly Jazvac’s “readymade” plastiglomerate (a newly designated geologic formation of sand, coral, and plastic); Maika’i Tubbs’ attempts to replicate platiglomerate’s geology; and Mary Babcock’s weavings of plastic fishing line found on the shores of the Hawaiian Islands.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" of Thursday, July 21st, 2016. 

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Weaving for the Soul

BY RENÉ BAHLOO
@ VOL 18 ON AUG 24, 2016

“I have shared my deepest essence, my creative energy, and so the world is dream into being”

In Weaving for the Soul from PechaKucha Night Sunshine Coast Vol.18 , René Bahloo explains her special interest as an artist in the practice and philosophy of weaving, using natural plant fibres. She shares her knowledge locally through a number of weaving circles and facilitates transformational journeys to remote Indigenous Australian and African communities, for deep connection to land, culture, healing and traditional weaving. Her sculptural installation pieces have been present at a number of conferences and have also been discovered contemplating life, the universe and everything. In her presentation Rene shares her passion for connecting culture, womens' business, personal growth and environmental awareness into the weaving of her life, and into the lives of others.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on September 27th, 2016. 

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Time and Tide

BY JO ATHERTON
@ VOL 7 ON SEP 27, 2016

Artist Jo Atherton highlights the diversity of plastic objects washing ashore on the British coastline, and how the ubiquity of this material enables us to reinterpret stories of our time. Millions of years ago, fuelled by sunlight, marine plankton flourished and then settled on the ocean floor, slowly transforming into oil. This same oil is used to produce the endless plastic objects that dominate our everyday lives. When inked and printed, plastic flotsam fragments bear a stark resemblance to the rich diversity of microscopic marine life - a worrying and ironic connection to a beautiful natural process. 

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Weaving in the Goodness

BY BECK PARNHAM
@ VOL 32 ON SEP 26, 2017

Rebecca Parnham is one of the co-founders of Krama and Co. a company that supports the production of krama (traditional Cambodian scarves). She loves krama and everything they represent. Rebecca’s goal has always been to weave the goodness into every step of what she does. Her PechaKucha talk “Weaving in the Goodness” discusses how social work and the strengths perspective informs her.

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Jolobil, Weaving Identities

BY DIANA ALBARRAN GONZALEZ
@ VOL 34 ON MAR 05, 2018

Jolobil means to weave and Diana Albarrán González is exploring textiles as a development strategy in her native Mexico.  The patterns on fabric tell stories about the identity of the weaver. She explores how we are connected to our land and culture through what we wear.

Diana was born and raised in the Mayan land of Chiapas, Mexico, a mestiza with Nahua, Japanese, Spanish and P’urhépecha ancestry. She holds a Master in Design Management from Polytechnic University of Valencia in Spain, a Bachelor of Industrial Design from Autonomous University of Guadalajara in Mexico, and a Training Diploma in Modern Design and Craftmanship from Kyoto Institute of Technology in Japan. She is currently a PhD Candidate at Auckland University of Technology in Aotearoa focusing on ethical and respectful collaborations with indigenous artisanal communities that go beyond economic benefits, and the decolonisation of design and its practitioners.

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Reflection & Depth

BY FELICITY TRUSCOTT
@ VOL 9 ON MAR 08, 2018

Felicity Truscott explores the idea that a line can be both a physical object and a train of thought, and descibes the making of ephemeral artworks.

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Weaving Magic

BY LUCY DAVIDSON
@ VOL 30 ON MAY 02, 2018

From hobbiest to professional crafter, Lucy Davidson shares her creative journey, from learning new weaving skills to dying her own wool and using special frames made by her father. 

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A Weaver's Tale

BY SIOBHAN MARTIN
@ VOL 32 ON NOV 07, 2018

A sustainable textile artist based between Kent and Brighton, Siobhan Martin launched Shiv Textiles in 2017 to explore the concepts of hand-made and local, whilst drawing on the inspiration from the global.