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PechaKucha Presentation

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Stacey Robinson

Artist and Adjunct Art Professor, University at Buffalo, Department of Art in Buffalo

"The work becomes a conversation about class, race, gender and appropriation."

In Building Afrotopia from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, artist Stacey Robinson illustrates how speculating black futures became paramount in his artistic practice as a response to the global displacement of Black and Indigenous people. Robinson shares recent work, beginning with his current Pan-African flag series, representing nations where Black and Indigenous populations are controlled by extreme measures. Robinson then shares works from an in-progress book, 100 Afrofuturists Practitioners, depicting people building future spaces where Black peace exists using S.T.E.A.M (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art(s), and Math). Lastly, Robinson presents works inspired by the past Black Renaissance speculative Black Futures, with Afrofuturist digital collages inspired by Romare Bearden, James Denmark, Manzel Bowman, and other past and contemporary mixed media collage artists. 

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Having Black Friends: A "Do" and "Don't" Guide to Racial Understanding

BY DUANTE BEDDINGFIELD
@ VOL 10 ON FEB 23, 2012

Duante Beddingfield is a local writer whose work can be found in the Dayton Daily News and on the Welcome Dayton website. In his presentation, Duante hopes to help guide us towards a post-racial America. (in English)

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Sci-Fi Utopia

BY JEAN-CHARLES REMICOURT-MARIE
@ VOL 1 ON APR 12, 2013

Jean-Charles Remicourt-Marie is obsessed with science fiction and the concept of utopia. In this presentation he shares with us a piece of his research, starting with imaginary worlds taken from paintings and movies, and then showing their transcendence into our world. He even recommends some books for those who share his interest. (in French)

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Racial Justice and the Climate Crisis

BY BILL GALLEGOS
@ VOL 13 ON APR 30, 2015

With over three decades of organizing experience with unions, students, and grassroots organizations, activist-in-residence at Havens Center for Social Justice, Bill Gallegos discusses the complexities of climate change's affect on racial justice. He shares his some of his experiences in achieving environmental programs that ensure low-income communities and communities of color receive the health, environmental, and economic benefits of sound environmental policy.

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Civil Rights @ WKU

BY SUELLYN LATHROP
@ VOL 6 ON OCT 20, 2015

Suellyn Lathrop has been the Western Kentucky University Archivist since 2007. She chronicles the history of civil rights as it has played out at Western Kentucky University.

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The Myth of Perfection: Tolerance is a Matter of Plus or Minus, Choose Your Degree

BY ALEXANDRA P. SPAULDING
@ VOL 15 ON FEB 04, 2016

"You know there's no such thing as perfection, right?...If you can collectively make the imperfections work, you have perfection."

In The Myth of Perfection (Tolerance is a Matter of Plus or Minus, Choose Your Degree) from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 15, Buffalo-based artist and engineer Alexandra P. Spaulding reflects on her artistic practice, her love of minimalism, and her eventual acceptance of inevitable imperfections. Examining the notions of tolerance and how exacting to the millionth decimal point does not equal perfection, Spaulding focuses both on the visual arts (Minimalism), her own practice (aurally immersive installation art), engineering and manufacturing, and how the conflux of these three schools of thought have made her more accepting of 'the happy accident' and a better artist.  

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Buffalo Vitascope: The Story of the World's First Movie Theater

BY PAT KEWLEY
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"The world's first movie theater was in Buffalo, New York."

In Buffalo Vitascope: The Story of the World's First Movie Theater from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, comedian and cartoonist Pat Kewley tells the true story of Vitascope Hall, which opened on Buffalo, New York's Main Street in 1896 and was likely the world's first permanent, specially constructed movie theater. Using period photographs, newspaper clippings, and his own cartoon drawings, Kewley spreads the word about Buffalo's amazing & unique place in film history, touching on the early days of moviegoing, the first films, and the unsung Buffalonians who helped pioneer the film industry in our own backyard.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, Jun 29th, 2016. 

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Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975

BY CHARLES L. DAVIS, II, PH.D.
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"We started with several books that looked at the brownstone as a site of intervention."

In Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975 from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Charles L. Davis, II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, shows works from his recent exhibition project, Building Black Utopias, and discusses the literature that served as inspiration. 

The Building Black Utopias project combines the tools of the architect, the historian and the literary critic to recover the historical contributions of African American writers to architectural utopian thought. It specifically examines the role of literary depictions of place in June Jordan, Amiri Baraka, Paule Marshall and Angela Davis’ writings. Davis argues that each authors’ rhetorical manipulations of the built environment operates on the same level as architectural utopian thought insofar as both mediums created rich, alternative depictions of modernist space to liberate the architect’s imagination. The final exhibit translates the spatial ideas of literature into drawings, models and other ephemera.

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Collage City

BY JEAN-MICHEL REED
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016.

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Why Forests Matter

BY JIM HOWE
@ VOL 19 ON MAR 14, 2018

"This is the Black-throated Green Warbler. I know how to do the birdcall for this, but I'll do it afterwards, I promise."

In Why Forests Matter from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 19, Deputy Executive Director of the Nature Conservancy of Central & Western New York, Jim Howe, explains the three-part mission of organization: to protect land and water (120 million acres around the world, including 100,000 acres in Western and Central New York), to transform policy and practice for sustainability and to inspire people to connect with nature. Why do forests matter? Howe leads us on a tour of protected forest lands that provide imporved healthed and mental outlook, as well as critical habitats for wildlife. And Howe's Black-throated Green Warbler call was a show stopper!