EDMONTON Posts

"We are not just spectators in the universe.... we actually have a special place within it."

In How We Know, What We Know About the Universe from PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol. 29, Reuben Gazer takes us on a journey connecting our childhood discoveries of patterns and shapes in our surroundings to scientific revelations about the formation of the universe, showing us where to look to find parallels between earthly and interstellar forms.

 

"80 percent of people under of the age of 30 want to change career paths but feel like they can't already. I started to wonder, what is going on with work? Why is it so confusing? Why is it this tormenting thing that's tying us in knots?"

In "Next Generation Work, Next Generation Workers" from PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol. 25 Tyler Waye asks the fundamental question: how do you find success in the confusing and somewhat frustrating world of work? 

Child-Friendly in the City

"Children are part of our cities. If our cities aren't designed for children, then they're not meant for citizens. If they're not meant for citizens, they're not cities."

In "Child-Friendly in the City" from PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol.25Ian Smith speaks to a demographic whose voices often go unheard in urban decision-making: children. In Ian's presentation, he challenges us to view our spaces through the eyes of the younger generation while acknowledging that we all have a part to play in building child-friendly cities.

 

"We have to get back to that circle where we're sitting together because that was the intention—that we're all Treaty people. We have a responsibility and an obligation to the lands, the waters, to each other and to our children."

In "Inviting the Indigenous Sports World to Edmonton" from PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol. 28, Jodi Stonehouse sheds light on the beauty of the World Indigenous Nations Games soon to visit Edmonton—what they mean for the city, for Indigenous peoples, and for every one of us looking to grow and reconcile together.

“Stopping is an overlooked good of riding a bicycle in the city. It’s completely overlooked when we seal ourselves in our automobiles.”

Glenn Kubish shares the story of a group of commuters who take the time to stop and have a hot cup of coffee in the cold Edmonton morning, giving us a new approach to enjoying the weather—and the company—when heading from point A to point B.

"For something that's affordable, a mature technology, and the next generation of energy infrastructure, this is something that makes a ton of sense."

In Lightspeed in Edmonton at PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol. 26,  Progress Alberta's Duncan Kinney argues for a significant leap towards sustainable transit infrastructure and shares why he's helping build movement to encourage the Edmonton to procure enough renewable energy to power our Light Rail Transit system.


“We are so privileged to be able to turn on our taps and have clean drinking water in an instant, but we often don’t think of the actual source of that water.”

In "#LoveYourHeadwaters" from PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol. 26Alison Ronson brings us from the city into the beautiful Alberta wilderness, encouraging us to get excited about our water—where it comes from, why it needs more protection, and what the average Edmontonian can do to #LoveYourHeadwaters.

There And Back Again: A Designer's Tale

"LA was just not the place for me anymore, so I packed up my stuff and moved home to Edmonton. But I had this flashly resume, so where would I fit in?"

In "There And Back Again: A Designer's Tale", from PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol.26, designer Melissa Krystofiak's career has taken her behind the scenes of some Hollywood's biggest movies. In this presentation, she shares how her experiences working in different design discliplines has shaped her ideas about work, community and creativity.

"We're all probably suffering from chronic low level stress... But we don't have a tool to bring us back to that rest and digest."

In "Inhale | Exhale" from PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol. 25, Pamella Heikel takes us on a personal journey of ups and downs as she learns how to truly breathe—and appreciate and conquer that persistent foe in all of our lives: stress.



"Children are part of our cities. If our cities aren't designed for children, then they're not meant for citizens. If they're not meant for citizens, they're not cities."

In Child Friendly in the City from PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol.25Ian Smith speaks to a demographic whose voices often go unheard in urban decision-making: children. Though this talk, he challenges us to view our spaces through youthful eyes, while acknowledging that we all have a part to play in building child friendly cities.

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