BUFFALO Posts

 

"I want to destabilize the viewer in relation to the work."

In "Confined Architectural Space and Psychological Unease" from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 14, artist, sculpture, and professor, Gary Sczerbaniewicz shares his practice involving an insatiable fascination with interior architectural spaces that evoke a sense of psychological unease. This compulsion toward an aesthetics of anxiety leads him to fabricate confined space environments which include-scale shifts-using architectural models seamlessly blended into full-sized structures - into which the viewer is invited to physically enter and explore.



Joanna Gillespie steals the PechaKucha People Spotlight this week. An independent consultant and project manager for the arts & culture sector, she co-organizes PechaKucha Night Buffalo (along with Nick Bruscia, Clinical Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo Department of Architecture). From the early days of fastening a projector to a bar stool with duct tape, to the recent PechaKucha Buffalo 10th Anniversary celebration at Buffalo's esteemed Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Joanna sees PechaKucha as a way to bring different groups together to share ideas.

"Sometimes creative people are so engrossed in their own work they don't have an opportunity to connect with the larger community. PechaKucha is a space for architects, actors, artists and activists to share ideas and maybe even spark a collaboration. That's what inspires us to keep organizing events." 

We couldn't be more proud of Joanna's PechaKucha Passion! Way to go PechaKucha Buffalo Team! 
 

“We devised a few rules: Start with the architecture. Consider its history. Draw from its mythology.”

In "Site-Based Performance: Development of a Process" fromPechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, Artistic Director and Co-Founder of Torn Space Theatre in Buffalo, NY, Dan Shanahan, reveals Torn Space's process of developing site-based performance. Drawing from over 10 years of experience and eight original pieces for non-traditional performance venues, Shanahan addresses the influences, aesthetics, and rules for Torn Space's site-based performances.

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape.

Foraging and Picking


"Architects are hunters and gatherers." 

In "Foraging and Picking" from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 17, professor of architecture Brian Carter provides a retrospective of twenty postcards from his many travels, highlighting what each image signifies in the mind of an architect. Carter reminds us that architecture can be an international language. It prompts travel, causing us walk into buildings, to meet people, and to listen, sense and smell the places that we go. 

A Brief Memoir of Architectural Space


"This is my 6-minute memoir. A mediation on impermanence."

In A Brief Memoir of Architecural Space from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, independent arts consultant and co-organizer of PechaKucha Buffalo, Joanna Gillespie, delivers a meditation on twenty of the fifty places she has lived since birth. From Victorian-era structures in Buffalo, NY and San Francisco, CA, to the wilds of the 1970's California coast, to modern and efficient rural Japan, to a Postmodern art utopia in Maine, and beyond, Gillespie recounts a particular memory from each space. Through all of the temporal landscapes we find ourselves in, Gillespie concludes, "We forge on, either clumsily or assuredly. We keep on keeping on." Even if we move fifty times.

 

"I'm interested in the peaceful, private experience between each piece and its user."

In Design Life from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 16, designer and principal of Manuel Barreto StudioPedro Manuel shares a poignant and personal glimpse into his inspiration and practice, from Portugal to Buffalo, exploring how design affects our lives and the relation between the user and the environment.

 

"The Belt Line … will be the next phase in Buffalo’s sustainable development."

In The Belt Line: Hiding in Plain Sight from PechaKucha Night BuffaloVol. 16, urbanist and preservationist, Chris Hawley, presents the Belt Line -- one of the most conspicuous and least-known features of Buffalo, NY. Each day, trains go by along it and people drive underneath and over it. It is the "third strand" in Buffalo's DNA, as important to the city's physical and economic geography as Joseph Ellicott's radial and grid plan and Frederick Law Olmsted's park and parkway system; as consequential to the city's development as the Erie Canal and Interstate Highway System.

The Belt Line was opened in 1883, with segments dating back to 1836. The rail line is 15 miles long, forming a continuous loop through Buffalo╩╝s downtown as well as the prominent industrial loft clusters that it helped to create. Today, the Belt Line's 12 million square feet of largely vacant or underutilized industrial space is the city's next frontier for sustainable development. Factory buildings are being recycled as mixed-use developments. These former industrial areas are becoming walkable centers again.


"I make art about ineffectual dreamers who try really hard to succeed at something but always fail miserably."

In Fabricating History from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, artist and founder of the Great Moments in Western Civilization CooperativeCaitlin Cass, focuses on the need for diverse sources in creative research, especially when you invent them yourself. She reflects on the subjectivity of history and explains how she co-opts historical authority to create comics and counterfeit historical exhibits. Walking us through her artistic process from the stage of “tadpole” to “strawberry dart frog,” Cass presents highlights of her recent comic book an counterfeit historical exhibits, such as “Folktales of American History” and “The Museum of Failure.” 


"The world's first movie theater was in Buffalo, New York."

In Buffalo Vitascope: The Story of the World's First Movie Theater from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, comedian and cartoonist Pat Kewley tells the true story of Vitascope Hall, which opened on Buffalo, New York's Main Street in 1896 and was likely the world's first permanent, specially constructed movie theater. Using period photographs, newspaper clippings, and his own cartoon drawings, Kewley spreads the word about Buffalo's amazing & unique place in film history, touching on the early days of moviegoing, the first films, and the unsung Buffalonians who helped pioneer the film industry in our own backyard.

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