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Michael Ceballos

in Honolulu

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Animation Inspiration

BY MICHAEL CEBALLOS
@ VOL 30 ON MAY 05, 2017

"Our heritage gives life to our spirit." 

Socks, booze, family, landscapes, and lore......inspiration comes from many sources and leads to a wide variety of creative output.  In "Animation Inspiration" from PechaKucha Night Honolulu Vol. 30, three artists/animators will share various creative projects and the inspiration for their work.  We also share a sneak peek of animated films and virtual reality projects being shown in the upcoming Cultural Animation Film Festival at the Doris Duke Theatre.


Matthew Kawika Ortiz is a Hawai‘i-based artist who specializes in storyboards, illustration, graphic design,and printmaking. Mr. Ortiz started out his career interning and creating conceptual art for the Warner Brothers feature film Superman Returns, he also storyboarded for all three E Ho‘omau!, Ola Nā Iwi: Hāloa, and co Art Directed Maisa the Chamoru Girl who Saves Guåhan. Matthew is also one half of the art duo Wooden Wave which is known for their illustrations and murals of sustainable treehouses.

Michael Q. Ceballos was born and raised in Los Angeles, CA.  He has worked in animation industry for over 20 years. Among the many diverse projects he has worked on, there are a few notable highlights. In 2013, Mr. Ceballos formed Twiddle Productions Inc. where he produced and directed Ola Na Iwi: Hāloa and Maisa the Chamoru Girl who Saves Guåhan which won Best Short Film at the 2017 Pasifika Film Festival.


Mary Therese Perez Hattori
A native of Guåhan (Guam), she is one of nine children of Paul Mitsuo Hattori and Fermina Leon Guerrero Perez Hattori and resides on O‘ahu with her son and husband.  Dr. Hattori currently serves as Outreach Director for the Center for Pacific Islands Studies at UHM and is affiliated with the Doctorate in Professional Education Practice, the Indigenous Politics Program, and the Learning Design & Technology Program at UH.

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Females in Comics and Animation

BY MICHAEL CEBALLOS
IN HONOLULU

Women have been underrepresented in literature, comics, and animation.  In the Pacific, traditional indigenous ideals of female beauty have been marred by distorted western representations of exoticism, objectification, and sexualization. This team of creatives shares their thoughts about this problem, the work being done to change this, and their representations of ancestral female heroines and contemporary female superheroes in their comics and animated films. Michael CeballosMary Hattori, and Christopher Caravalho share.