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Kids Channel

We've had people of all ages do presentations in the PechaKucha 20x20 format, and that includes kids. Here is a collection of presentations we've shared on the site that were done by children in cities all over the world.

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MINI Channel

MINI matches the fast-paced fun of PechaKucha. These 20x20 PechaKucha presentations from all around the world explore the creativity which is now synonymous with the Mini brand - from Paul Smith to Rinpa Eshidan

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Autodesk Channel

Autodesk is changing the way the world is designed and made. Everyone—from design professionals, engineers and architects to digital artists, students and hobbyists—uses Autodesk software to unlock their creativity and solve important challenges. Autodesk's partnership with PechaKucha includes a presence at design weeks and festivals around the world through special PechaKucha Night events

PAST VOL 5

Lake Ridge @ Tall Oaks Community Center
Feb 12, 2011

PAST VOL 28

Vancouver @ The Vogue Theatre
Jun 13, 2013

PAST VOL 2

Aberdeen @ The Belmont Filmhouse
Oct 22, 2013

PAST PechaKucha at WAF 2013

World Architecture Festival @ Flower Dome, Gardens by the Bay
Oct 02, 2013

PAST Love, Humor and the End of the World

Umeå @ Bildmuseet
Oct 19, 2013

PAST VOL 2

Erfurt @ Franz Mehlhose Kulturcafé
Nov 22, 2014

PAST VOL 8

Richmond, BC @ Richmond Cultural Centre
Nov 20, 2014

PAST VOL 23

Dayton @ Dayton Convention Center
May 16, 2015

PAST VOL 3

Prince George @ Old Homework Building
May 26, 2015

PAST VOL 12

Aberdeen @ The Belmont Filmhouse
Oct 20, 2015

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Wearable Technology for All

BY JENSIN ELAINE
@ VOL 6 ON OCT 19, 2015

Jensin Wallace relates her trip to Slovenia to collaborate with a man suffering from tetraplegia to create custom smart clothing to assist him on a day to day basis - all controlled by his cell phone! Wow!

Jensin was trained as textile textile designer at the Rhode Island School of Design and experimented with how to make sound and emotions tangible. After getting some experience in the luxury fashion industry, she went back to school and received a Masters of Design focusing in fashion and technology. Currently she works as a sweater technical designer for a high end women's label in NYC.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Monday, November 9th, 2015. 

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Free Your Fitness, Free Yourself

BY TEGA BRAIN
@ VOL 6 ON OCT 19, 2015

Does your lifestyle prevent you from qualifying for insurance discounts? Do you lack sufficient time for exercise or have limited access to sports facilities? Maybe you just want to keep your personal data private without having to pay higher insurance premiums for the privilege?

Unfit Bits provides solutions. At Unfit Bits, we are investigating DIY fitness spoofing techniques to allow you to create walking datasets without actually having to share your personal data. These techniques help produce personal data to qualify you for insurance rewards even if you can't afford a high exercise lifestyle. 

Our team of experts are undertaking an in-depth Fitbit Audit to better understand how the Fitbit and other trackers interpret data. With these simple techniques using everyday devices from your home, we show you how to spoof your walking data so that you too can qualify for the best discounts. Our new range of desktop fitness devices are also available on this site. 

Free your fitness. Free yourself. Earn Rewards.

 

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Tega Brain is an artist and engineer. She makes eccentric engineering, reimagining everyday technologies to address their politics and envision alternatives. She is currently a resident at Eyebeam Center for Art and Technology, Brooklyn, has both studied and taught at the School for Poetic Computation, and is an Assistant Professor at SUNY Purchase. 

Surya Mattu is an artist and engineer based in Brooklyn. He is currently a fellow at Data&Society where he is investigating infrastructure with a focus on wireless as a way to better understand bias in technology. He is also a contributing researcher at ProPublica. Previously he has worked as an engineer at Bell Labs and is a graduate from the New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program. He has a degree in Electronics and Telecommunication from the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom.

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Adventures in Extreme Sewing

BY FREDRIK FÄRG
@ VOL 129 ON OCT 28, 2015

"When we told [our production methods] to some producers, they didn't believe us. This is the sewing machine we bought ourselves to figure out how to do it."

In Adventures in Extreme Sewing from PechaKucha Night Tokyo Vol. 129, Swedish furniture designer Fredrik Färg of the design studio FÄRG & BLANCHE wows us with his daring feats of EXTREME SEWING as he pushes the envelope of industrial production methods using experimental materials to produce uniquely expressive pieces of furniture.

家具デザイン、工業デザイン、アートなど、多岐にわたるクリエイティブフィールドにおいて実験的なアプローチで次々と作品を発表し、世界中のデザイン関係者から注目されているスウェーデンのデザインスタジオFÄRG & BLANCHE。メンバーのFredrik Färgさんが、近作のユニークな縫製家具が生まれた背景を明らかにされています!彼らの制作プロセスは必見です!

This was "Presentation of the Day" on Friday, November 20th, 2015. 

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The United Nations of Food

BY CHARLES BIBILOS
@ VOL 7 ON DEC 04, 2015

Hear Charles Bibilos, writer of the United Nations of Food blog, talk about his quest to eat food from every country in the world (160 countries), without ever leaving New York City. Yum!

Help Charles finish his quest! Help him eat: East Timor, North Korea, Papua New Guinea, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Botswana, Burundi, Central African Republic, Djibouti, The Gambia, Kenya, Mauritania, Mauritius, Namibia, Republic of the Congo (Congo-Brazzaville), Rwanda, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

If you can help, or want to go out to eat with Charles, email him at unitednationsoffood@gmail.com

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A Journey in Hats

BY ELEANOR O'CONNELL
@ VOL 16 ON SEP 01, 2016

New York based and originally from Papua New Guinea, Eleanor O'Connell has been working within the Theatre, Performance Art, Film, Fashion and Design industry as a Costumier, Costume Designer, Wardrobe Manager, Milliner and Artist from London to Melbourne and now New York. Listen to her journey here!

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Art of the Pencils

BY CAROLINE WEAVER
@ VOL 16 ON SEP 01, 2016

“Pencil is a small thing that can make a big difference in the lives of people who use them.”

In "Art of the Pencil" from PechaKucha Night New York Vol.16 , Caroline Weaver, amateur pencil collector but lifelong pencil lover, founded CW Pencil Enterprise in November 2014. With her pencil experts, Caroline digs up the stories and origins of these objects and make them accessible to those who appreciate them for their functionality, beauty and history. As simple as it may be, the pencil is something which despite advances in technology will never become obsolete.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, December 13th, 2016.

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The Power of Radio

BY CARLOS CHIRINOS
@ VOL 16 ON SEP 01, 2016

Originally from Caracas, Venezuela, Carlos Chirinos’ work explores innovation and creativity in emerging global music industries, looking at the role of music in public health, international development and social change. He has been a key consultant for radio and music projects in Europe, Africa and Japan - and most recently worked to develop Africa Stop Ebola, a global music campaign to raise awareness about Ebola in West Africa that was featured in the New York Times, The Guardian, BBC and CNN, for which he received an award from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Department of Defense, and USAID.

Currently, Professor Chirinos collaborates with the David Rubenstein Atrium at Lincoln Center, curating music performances to engage the Latin community living in New York City. He is also involved in projects in the UK, Tanzania, Cuba and other countries, looking at the role of music industries in economic development, tourism and social entrepreneurship. He also runs New York University's Music and Social Change Lab

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Japan and the Temporal Craftsmen

BY NICHOLAS COFFEE
@ VOL 17 ON MAR 09, 2017

Nicholas Coffee takes us through history of temporal craftsmen with examples of temples and shrines across Japan. His study was made possible by the Georgia Trust Foundation.

Nicholas is a LEED AP Architectural Designer at FXFOWLE working on a range of projects in NYC from urban design to interior design. Previously he worked at Bjarke Ingels Group on a variety of projects including the Hot to Cold exhibition and publication. He holds a Masters of Architecture from the Georgia Institute of Technology and a Bachelors of Environmental Design from the University of Colorado at Boulder (his hometown.)

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From Barrel to Bottle

BY WILL DRUCKER
@ VOL 17 ON MAR 09, 2017

Will Drucker is a sustainability practitioner and whiskey lover. At PechaKucha Night NYC, Will takes us through the history and process of whiskey making - from the tree to the bottle!

Will is devoted to building businesses that support the circular economy. Will hails from the cities and farms of the Midwest. College took him to Vermont where he studied neuroscience and deepened his love for the natural world. Will can't resist music, birds, biking, good food and adventure.

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Hacking the Office

BY WES ROZEN
@ NEW YORK BUILD ON MAR 16, 2017

Wes Rozen is one of the founding partners of SITU Studio, where he leads some of the company's more experimental projects - including interdisciplinary collaborations with artists, filmmakers, and environmental organizations.  Wes takes us through the new Google Creative Lab offices in NY.

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PechaKucha on Top of the World

PechaKucha Night in Kansas City organizer Jayne Higdon has returned from an epic journey through China and Nepal, and took the time to claim Everest as a PechaKucha location -- here's the photo to prove it!

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Traveling the World

Vicente Frare has traveled the world, and in this presentation, he gives us a visual tour of what he's experienced, with a few fun photos along the way. It was recorded at PechaKucha Night in Curitiba Vol. 1, and is in Portuguese.

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All the World's a Square

Knitter extraordinaire Bernd Kestler is on a misson to make the world's largest 'Granny Square Blanket'. In this edition of Presentation of the Day (from PKN Tokyo Vol. 102), Bernd certainly has his work cut out for him -- at 7,150 squares of 20 x 20 cm (nudge, nudge) -- but he won't be doing it alone! He's asking for crocheters across the globe to submit their squares to make this a Guinness World Record, promptly thereafter be divided into afghans, and sent to support 2011 Tohoku earthquake victims in temporary housing. To find out more, or to submit your own square, check out his Knit for Japan website.

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The World's Tallest Twisted Building

"We rotated each floor 1.2 degrees, almost doing a true 90 degree rotation at about 88 floors."  Jo Palma discusses the ideas and plans behind the twisted building in Dubai. In "The World's Tallest Twisted Building" from PKN Chicago Vol. 28, we hear that the project was initiated by a Chicago team and was designed with passive sustainable methods and long-term economic value in mind. As of now it is the tallest twisting building in the world and it all started in Chicago. 

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Ski Jumps of the World

“This is one of the most iconic ski-jumping structures constructed.” PechaKucha co-founder Mark Dytham takes us on a tour of some of the most outstanding ski jumps found around the world. In “Ski Jumps of the World" from PKN Tokyo Vol. 120, he highlights the historical aspects of the sport of ski jumping -- and being the Englishman that he is, giving props to the one and only Eddie the Eagle.

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Rainbow Seen Round the World

“The space of the Global Rainbow is inclusive…it is reflective and meditative.” Artist Yvette Mattern speaks on “The Global Rainbow”, a large-scale ongoing public artwork. In “Rainbow Seen Round the World” from PKN Cleveland Vol. 23 Yvette tells us of the responses her work has elicited.

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All the World's a Square

"We wanted to make the world's largest crochetted blanket."In All the World's a Square, from Tokyo, Vol. 124, repeat PechaKucha Presenter, and Yokohama Knit Artist, Bernd Kestler started an initiative called "Knit for Japan" in response to the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of 2011. Originally aimed at providing knitting supplies for people of Tohoku, the project evolved into the "Granny Square Project” in which Bernd collected 20cm X 20cm knitted squares from all around the world. Little did he know he would receive so many that he was able to create the world's largest crocheted blanket. Check out how this creative project became greater than the sum of all its parts. 

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Rockin' in the Free World

"We learned so many lessons, not just about playing on the stage but also about each other. We learned how very strong our friendship is compared to others." In Rockin' in the Free World from PechaKucha Night Tokyo Vol. 127, local rocker and bassist for the independent Tokyo-based 3-piece band "Tits, Tats, and Whiskers", Astrid Sison shares some of the trials, tribulations, wonders, and joys of fearlessly rocking the stage, self-recording and releasing, touring the world, and being a part of a band of friends with a shared musical vision. Sison's charisma comes through as she touches on the hard work and passion that she and her bandmates pour into their musical aspirations. No doubt, these rockers are living the dream!

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Analog Creation in a Digital World

“What you use influences what you create. I say, take that into consideration, try putting down the macbook, pull out a notebook, and get your Hemingway on.” In Analog Creation in a Digital World from Pechakucha Night Salt Lake City Vol. 16, Tyson Call, who is a writer, photographer, and motorcycle rider, talks about his story. For Tyson, however, sitting down to write on a computer creates too many distractions. Receiving a typewriter as a gift opened up a whole new perspective on the creative process and created a connection to the inner workings of other great writers like Hemmingway, Steinbeck, and Hunter S. Thompson. In this presentation, Tyson, muses on analog creation in a digital world and asks, "What have you done with a piece of paper? Nothing!"

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My 6 minutes and 40 seconds at PechaKucha!

          A beautiful testimonial by PechaKucha presenter Sonia Kar  So it began! The moment had come for me to take the stage. Rodrigo, one of the enthusiastic hosts of the evening, had started giving a grand introduction about what I was going to speak about in the next 6 minutes and 40 seconds on PechaKucha Maastricht Vol 31, being held at the prestigious Sint Janskerk. What would I say? Would I be able to keep pace with the 20 seconds timer on each slide or would I just make a mess of it? Would I be able to convey my story effectively? Actually all these questions crossed my mind some two months ago when I heard about PechaKucha 20X20 presentation format using picture slides. Bit intimidating that one has to convey adequately in 20 slides with a 20 sec/slide speed, but the concept was so terrific that I had to give it a try. My application as a guest speaker took some screening considering PechaKucha was celebrating the 40th anniversary of Maastricht University. However I handled the screening questions with the same passion as I would be doing while speaking (I in fact felt I was already on stage). To my joy, I was informed that the very talented PechaKucha team had selected me. Next came the daunting task of preparing the slides – setting my story right, hunting for the appropriate pictures for the slides. That actually was not as difficult as I thought it would be. Though it called for some iterations, lots of “gentle” reminders and patience from PechaKucha team members especially Zhen (thank you for bearing with all the stupid questions which came your way). However, the issues were faced when I thought of practising. Just two days left for the event, I was making a mess. I remember the first time I practised – the entire 20 slides (each with 20 seconds) were over and I had not finished half of my story! I was always gifted with this art of talking a lot and not being precise. That would definitely be put to the test now. So then came the phase of cutting it short and making it just fit within 20 seconds. The next time I practised, I finished the story when I was in slide 10! The pressure of finishing the story was high so I missed mentioning half of the points which I had to. With some iterations I was ultimately there. On the D-day, when we reached Sint Janskerk - it was a packed house. The stage was set and rows of chairs were placed perfectly surrounding the stage. There were at least 300 people. I was trying to find familiar faces (as that would boost my confidence– human psychology as talking to known people is less of a stress than addressing unknown people) but there were hardly any. Then came the reassuring words from my husband – “You have spoken at a gathering of 100 people before. Speaking to 100 people and 300 people will feel the same”. Feeling a bit relaxed by his remark, I went and chose a comfortable spot. What I loved the most was the concept of starting with the programme at 20:20. All the speakers were outstanding, the topics and their stories were thought-provoking. There were a lot of ideas and energies which were brought in. The audience (I being a part of it too) was completely enlightened and very enthusiastic. The more I watched the speakers, the more tensed I became. It was already intimidating to match the standards set by the speakers. But I was banking on the audience, if I falter or forget something they will clap and cheer me for that too :) Then came my turn. Rodrigo announced my name and yes, I was on stage. What was playing in my mind in the first two seconds – “Wow, that’s a lot of people looking at me, how do I engage with them? Oops, watch your posture, where are your hands, oh no, I have a microphone, what were the first lines?  Ah forget it, just be yourself”.  (Yeah, mind is faster than light, all this I thought in two seconds) And that’s what happened for the next 6 minutes 40 seconds – I was myself. I spoke about how we had come up with HomeHandi, an online platform which connects passionate cooks to food lovers like us and provides healthy home cooked food options. The most interesting part of the talk was when I started speaking about our learnings. I could feel an immediate connection with the audience. The one on how we could empower most of the cooks who were women homemakers by boosting their self-confidence and making them financially independent was appreciated by everyone. By the time I spoke about how we realised that people from various cultures unite or bond together over food, I was completely at ease. “Food is a universal language and we see it as an enabler to connect people from various countries i.e. expats, students and locals together. That is exactly what we saw happening in our flagship event – International Food Festival held in Maastricht. Why not make Maastricht city as one of the pioneers in forming a culturally inclusive community?” While saying all this,  it really did not hit me that I was at this grand location or event. I felt as if it was a normal chit-chat which I was having with a group of friends of mine (PechaKucha actually signifies chit-chat).  I spoke without any inhibitions and my passion controlled my speech. I enjoyed thoroughly those 6 minutes and 40 seconds which came my way. At the end of the event I was approached by many familiar faces – familiar as I had seen them from the podium so now they were no more unfamiliar to me. I felt that PechaKucha gave me that platform to bring out the confidence in me, helped me to approach and interact with so many people, gave me the opportunity to enlighten myself. The informal way of story-telling with pictures is something very unique and very heart warming. Thank you PechaKucha for my 6 minutes and 40 seconds :)   By Sonia Kar, HomeHandi