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SITEWIDE Search Results: “fantasy”

PAST VOL 1

Coventry @ The Tin Angel
Oct 12, 2010

PAST VOL 5

Fundão @ ANTIGA PRAÇA
Sep 06, 2014

PAST VOL 14

Burlington, VT @ Shelburne Museum
Nov 13, 2014

PAST VOL 5

Dumaguete @ Byblos at Oriental Hall
Feb 05, 2015

PAST VOL 27

Hong Kong @ XXX Studios
May 25, 2016

PAST VOL 28

Christchurch @ The Piano
Aug 25, 2016

PAST VOL 32

Dayton @ Roesch Library, University of Dayton
Aug 17, 2017

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Prophet of the Future

BY TOKYO GENSO
@ VOL 88 ON JAN 25, 2012

The artist known only as Tokyo Genso (a.k.a. Tokyo Fantasy) speaks on his post-apocalyptic illustrations. He goes into detail on the process behind creating these terrifying yet striking images of Tokyo after the human race has all but expired. Tokyo Genso elaborates on his desire to portray the world as it is intended exist: overtaken by the elements.

"Presentation of the Day" on September 25, 2013.

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Betraying the God of Light

BY JARED ANGEL
@ VOL 10 ON OCT 23, 2011

Author Jared Angel introduces his ebook, Betraying the God of Light, and explains his views on archetypal conflicts, and how he attempted to create a fantasy novel with a more complicated moral compass than simply good versus evil. He uses real world examples and popular fantasy stories to illustrate the problems with such a black and white worldview, and the lack of diversity that often accompanies it.

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Playing with Old Family Photographs

BY MATHILDE LEMONNIER
@ VOL 6 ON JUL 04, 2013

A singer and actress caught in the act of distorting family photographs, Mathilde Lemonnier revisits her work with black and delightful humour. When she was very young she began by asking for a few hairpieces that she found in magazine pictures so that she could play with the appearance of her ancestors. Exploding heads, eyes squinting, the frozen past in black and white is propelled to a fantasy realm in a colorful and spirited manner. (In French)

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Lemuria Project

BY JAMES ANSHUTZ
@ VOL 21 ON AUG 15, 2014

James Anshutz's photography career include clients such as Sony Music Japan, Honolulu Symphony, Children’s Miracle Network, and Hawaii Pacific Health. His work with children battling cancer has led to his current “Lemuria Project,” which celebrates the healing power of the imagination.

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My First Pinterest Project

BY CHRISTINE K
@ VOL 5 ON SEP 15, 2015

In 2004, Christine Kinnie was trapped, pregnant, already raising two children, with no car, and a crappy marriage in the basement suite of a suburban jungle in a foreign country. Martha Stewart was her only escape.

Now, eleven years later, has four children, a divorce, and new home. For the first time ever, she has found time for herself. and is finally pursuing her fantasies of elegant living and extravagent crafting through Pinterest. Be prepared to laugh as Christine shares her very personal tragedies and triumphs with a heavy dose of humour.

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My secret secret

BY JENNY-LEE HEYLEN
@ VOL 12 ON MAY 20, 2015

A collection of Unicorns like no other, Jenny-Lee shares with us her secret collection of unicorns - and we were the first to see it.

How wonderful - a unique collection of small, fragile, and completely collectible ornaments that are made for dreamers and believers. 

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Mom’s Japanese Monsters

BY PAMELA WESSON
@ VOL 5 ON JUN 07, 2016

In the 50s and 60s Pamela Wesson and her family lived in Japan. Her mother fell for antique woodblock prints of ghosts, demons and monsters, which Pamela presenter here tonight. Some of these creatures from centuries ago can be recognised today in Studio Ghibli and other animated films.

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Welten fantastisch denken

BY ULRICH DREES
@ VOL 5 ON SEP 04, 2016

Ein dunkler Wald mag auf Manche bedrohlich wirken - für Ulrich Drees beflügelt er jedoch seit frühester Kindheit die Kreativität. Die Vorstellung von Fabelwesen und deren Erlebnissen in diesen unbekannten Gegenden brachte ihn zu seiner Passion, dem Pen-and-paper Rollenspielen.

In "Welten fantastisch denken" erzählt er von der Faszination selbst erdachter Welten und seinen Plänen sein eigenes fantastisches Universum zu schaffen.

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Социальные проекты, нужны ли они Ижевску?

BY ОЛЕГ ВЫЛЕГЖАНИН
@ VOL 5 ON OCT 28, 2016

Олег Вылежанин - член Общественной палаты г. Ижевска, председатель правления Некоммерческого Партнерства "Альянс региональных компаний ИТ Удмуртской Республики", директор офиса "ЭПАМ Систэмз" в г. Ижевск, основатель и владелец "Центр Высоких Технологий". На вечере Печа Куча Ижевск Олег много лет создает новые IT-компании. Также он занимается рекламой компаний. И делает это оригинальными способами, через литературу-фантастику и другие социальные проекты. "Нужны ли городу Ижевску социальные проекты?"- смотрите в презентации.

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Improvisation: If you could call Europe, what would you say?

BY PECHAKUCHA NIGHT MAASTRICHT
@ VOL 32 ON FEB 06, 2017

In this improvisation on random slides, four volunteers from the audience got five slides each and skillfully improvised on the question: "If you could call Europe, what would you say?"

As none of them had seen the slides in advance, the sense of challenge and the high level of surprise greatly entertained the audience. 

A big thank you to Cristian Tala Sánchez, Osiris Hoepel, Cathy Kwanten and Fjære van der Stok for their participation!

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PKN Prague Vol. 11

For a look at the previous PechaKucha Night in Prague (Vol. 11), we try something a bit different, starting with a bit of a dialogue, written by organizer Jana Kostelecka. Take note that PKN Prague Vol. 12 will be held on April 16. A: Eleventh, it feels like going home from the first one was only yesterday. B: Yes, but yesterday wasn't a summer's eve. A: Hmm... but the amazement is exactly the same. B: Which was your favourite then? A: I loved Čestmír Suška's ability of seeing the most fragile beauty in the steel industrial waste, it was like multi-tonne easter eggs. B: When you look at the Zdeněk Ziegler posters where the fonts were hand-painted and collaged, one regrets that globalization moved on and that posters always come in one package with the films these days. You can hardly make an exhibition of the posters to one film these days. CTRL-C CTRL-V. A: I dreamed of fantasy worlds. Jakub Dvorský (Amanita Design). You live in a universe of the stub floating in the timeless space, inhabited with curious creatures and rockets made of cans of Kostelecke parky (sausages). Have you ever tried their game? …and the other chronicler of the insubstantial senses -- Alžběta Skálová. I wish I was a kid again, I remember my favourite illustrations were in the book Alice in Wonderland, but it was nothing like this. When we were small, there were too little books of unreal worlds and its inhabitants… …they came alive in the wicked pupetery of Martina Černá and Anna Issa Šotolová (Imagery). The rabbit-chicken teddy bear was kind of scary-funny. Moving down the rabbit hole. B: Then you have the too dark painters, the dark horor of gypsy folk songs in Ladislava Gažiová paintings and Vladimír Skrepl, the first AEROnaut. A: I fancied the book by Magdalena Kalistová on the green home. Only, the form does not correspond with the sense, so can there ever be beauty in green? And what about the architects? B: I am excited when I see people care about the landscape and public spaces, and restrain their greed for more in the means of expanding, in lieu of the quality of space. In this light, the A.LT work in Poznan is excellent. Jan Jehlík put his ideas on urbanism clear -- and it's not every day that you see a hand-painted presentation. A: I liked the simple garden resturant in the ZOO by FAM Architekti. B: Did you notice that the product designers at PechaKucha do toys? Are you seeing any connection between Jana's Zacharias or are they simply adorable. Adorable. HuberoKororo does a Dino Rocking Horse which reminded me of my blow-up buffalo of old. A: If I had studied hard, I would have been as knowledgeable as Jan H. Vitvar, and possibly would get the track of what Richard Loskot was doing with all the wiring. B: When is the next one? Čestmír Suška (sculptor) Čestmír Suška is working with steel and iron industrial waste, transforming its weighty substance into something airy, cutting out the borders of the space and letting the light in. He creates a possibility of meeting Richard Serra and Daniel Pirsc. Alžběta Skálová (illustrator and graphic designer) Alžběta Skálová is creating ethereal records of her feelings in dapples of pure colour which are comming alive. She is keyholing the soul and candidly letting it out. From the illustrations, you can smell the sea and hear the giggle of the creatures from the kitchen drawer, who wake up in the middle of the night. Alžběta is tightly collaborating with the children book publisher Baobab. Zdeněk Ziegler (graphic designer and typographer) Zdeněk Ziegler is best known for his film posters, of which he has created 274 between 1963 and 1989. It was the golden age of collage and hand-painted fonts. Imagine creating a poster to, say, Hitchcock's Birds, and having one smuggled in, magazine and a pencil in your hand. We are deep in the communist times, and the censorship is almighty. And still, you create super-temporal works. It can be thanks to the lack of readymade culture, and the almighty promotion of the film industry. Jakub Dvorský of Amanita Design (flash games, website, and vision designer) Amanita Design creates games from some kind of past universe, where you come accross the remains of a human civilisation grown back in nature. It creates a kind and snuggy world, floating in peace. You wake up into a dream with eyes wide open, and you can even meddle with its goings. It works in the most unpredictable and radiant way.

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A French Magazine About Graphic Design and Painted Fantasy Worlds

Presentations Alexandre Dimos is a French graphic designer, and in his presentation (from PKN Tokyo Vol. 95) he talks about Back Cover. As he explains, he couldn't find what he really wanted to read in France, and so he helped create an independant magazine focusing on thinking and analyzing graphic design and typographic practices, and to a larger extent, visual arts. Miro Pecho is a Slovak painter, and he uses his presentation (in Czech, from PKN Znojmo Vol. 1) to explain how different fantasy worlds influence his paintings. Posters We have two new posters on the Tumblr blog today, starting with PKN Malaga Vol. 3, pictured above (the event was held last night). The other addition is for PKN New Orleans Vol. 7, which is happening tomorrow night.  The image below is not a poster or a flyer, but rather part of a call for presenters for the next PKN in Genoa (or Genova), and we loved it so much we wanted to share it. All roads lead to PechaKucha! The event itself will take place on November 23. Calendar There are two PKNs on the agenda tonight (October 3), PKN Bilbao Vol. 13 and PKN Szczecin Vol. 1. Tomorrow, it's another big Thursday: PKN Pittsburgh Vol. 13, PKN Moncton Vol. 7, PKN Ekaterinburg Vol. 6, PKN Doha Vol. 6, PKN Vaxjo Vol. 12, PKN Kolding Vol. 18, and PKN New Orleans Vol. 7. 

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Prophet of the Future

Some call him "mischievious," others say he's a prophet, but to us he's Tokyo Genso.  In today's Presentation of the Day, "Prophet of the Future" from PKN Tokyo Vol. 88, the artist known only as Tokyo Genso (a.k.a. Tokyo Fantasy) speaks on his post-apocalyptic illustrations. He goes into detail on the process behind creating these terrifying yet striking images of Tokyo after the human race has all but expired. Tokyo Genso elaborates on his desire to portray the world as it is intended exist: overtaken by the elements.

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Loco-motives

"When I see that little locomotive, I smell the engine oil, it takes me back — I’m a kid again." TV screenwriter Andrew Gunn reveals to us his dirty little secret -- his love for model trains! In “Loco-motives” from PKN Christchurch Vol. 20, Gunn expresses his love for model trains, and how they allow him to escape into a fantasy world. He compares his job as a script writer for children's films to these miniature train worlds and says that he enjoys the feeling of safety and wonder these worlds provide. 

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A Mesozoic Misadventure

"If you have science fiction, you have to have a bit of science in it ... when you strip the science out of sci-fi, it's just fantasy."In A Mesozoic Misadventure from PechaKucha Night Colombo Vol. 5, Vasika Udurawane, a paleo-artist, poet and writer, tells us about his dinosaur world and what he thinks of the latest Jurassic Park movie. 

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Re-Thinking Maps and Mapping

By Jess Dunkin, On the Land Programs Consultant, NWT Recreation and Parks Association In late May, the NWT Recreation and Parks Association (NWTRPA) and the Prince of Wales Northern Heritage Centre (PWNHC) co-hosted the second of four PechaKucha Nights slated to happen in Yellowknife this year. The theme of this evening was Maps and Mapping, a topic which clearly resonated with Yellowknifers, as once again we had to add seats at the last minute! You can read about the first PechaKucha here. Maps are more than tools for navigation. They are also rich historical and cultural objects that tell us something about how we see the world. This makes them ripe for analysis and reflection, a fact that was amply demonstrated by the evening’s six presenters. MC Mike Mitchell introducing the evening (Photo: NWTRPA) The PechaKucha opened with a funny and thoughtful introduction by the snappily dressed MC for the evening Mike Mitchell. With a hand full of well-worn maps from his travels in British Columbia, South America, and the NWT, Mike demonstrated how maps remind us of journeys taken, people encountered, and experiences had. The first presenter was Yellowknife-based photographer Fran Hurcomb, who spent her 6 minutes and 40 seconds “unrolling” what might be the country’s longest map: a 128-foot long map of the Dehcho (Mackenzie River). After explaining how the map was used by boat captains navigating Canada’s longest river, we journeyed with Fran, her partner Dave, and their daughter from Hay River to Inuvik. This trip formed the basis for an exhibition at the museum a few years ago that linked archival photographs and her own images to points on the map. (Photo: Fran Hurcomb) The second presentation, which was delivered bySteve Schwarz, transported those gathered at the museum, from the NWT’s waterways to the skyways. Steve, a remote sensing analyst with the GNWT, demonstrated how satellite images and aerial photographs can help us to map, monitor, and better understand landscape change from forest fires in the Tłı̨chǫ to shoreline erosion on the Arctic Coast to slumps in the Gwich’in Settlement Area. Steve was followed by Rajiv Rawat, a mapmaker and media/tech specialist at the PWNHC with an almost encyclopaedic knowledge of the fantasy genre. Rajiv wowed the audience with his engaging analysis of maps and representations of the North in fantasy literature, films, and television shows. From the fourth presenter, Ingrid Kritsch, Research Director of the Gwich’in Tribal Council Department of Cultural Heritage (formerly the Gwich’in Social and Cultural Institute), we learned the story behind the Gwich’in Place Names project. Since 1992, the GTC has worked with elders and knowledge holders to gather information about named places in the Gwich’in Settlement Region. This information has formed the backbone of the Gwich’in Place Names Digital Atlas and a series of place-name maps produced by the GTC. Simon Whitehouse with the Rand McNally Geo-Physical Globe (Photo: Simon Whitehouse) Next, local journalist Simon Whitehouse reported on research he conducted while a graduate student into the history of the Rand McNally Geo-Physical Earth Globes. Long before the crew of Apollo 8 photographed the earth from space, these large globes (they measured six feet in diameter and weighed more than 400lbs!) allowed Americans to see a realistic interpretation of the world they inhabited. Simon also demonstrated how the globes captured advancements in various postwar sciences including geology, cartography, ecology, and space science. The evening’s final presenter was Tom Andrews. Before he accepted a position as an archaeologist with the GNWT, Tom worked for the Dene Nation on the Dene Mapping Project, a traditional land use and occupancy survey of Denendeh. The project team worked with 600 Dene and Metis trappers to document their land use on large maps. What is less well-know about the project is the long and tedious process of computerizing the information gathered during the many interviews, something that become abundantly clear during after Tom’s presentation. The Mapping Project has inspired and furnished data for other regional mapping project including the Sahtu Atlas and the aforementioned Gwich’in Place Names Atlas. Pop-up exhibit on maps and mapping (Photo: NWTRPA) In addition to the six presentations, the night featured a pop-up exhibit about maps and mapping that included a map roller used on board the CCGS Tembah, panels from the Gwich’in Place Names project, Bonnie Fournier’s art maps, and information about a mapping project graduate student Amanda DeGray is undertaking with the Yellowkives Dene. Bonnie Fournier with her art maps (Photo: NWTRPA) Arctic Tern furnished the presenters with maps as thanks for all of their hardwork. If you missed the event, some of the presentations are available here.