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PechaKucha Presentation

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Matthew Hume

Principal, Hume Projects LLC, Instructor, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning in Buffalo, NY

Return of the Master Builder

PRESENTED ON SEP 15, 2016
IN BUFFALO @ VOL 17

"I tell people I wear two hats—one of the designer and one of the builder, but as I evolve I wish to wear one hat, that of the Master Builder."

In the Return of the Master Builder from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17Adjunct Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning and Owner/Principle of HUME PROJECTS, LLC, Matthew Hume discusses his work creating residential and commercial projects, from the design phase through the construction phase. The traditional Master Builder once integrated both design and construction processes by direct involvement. The profession of architecture and processes of building are shifting back toward a more integrated approach forcing architects to re-evolve into earlier versions of themselves. Hume's recent work in design and construction projects serves as an example of this paradigm shift.

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A Number of Questionable Decisions

BY MICHAEL TUNKEY
@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

"What I focussed on was creating this building that could act like a binocular or a telescope to the landscape."

In A Number of Questionable Decisions from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 14, Architect with CannonDesign Michael Tunkey, shares the story of how after 18 years of traveling the world, he and his wife decided to return home to a small farm in Upstate NY to build a eautiful contemporary with a scenic view ...and all the trials and tribulations of doing so… hilarity ensues.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Monday, December 7th, 2015. 

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Realizing Good Ideas

BY CHRISTOPHER SIANO
@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

"It's not enough to have a good idea. To realize that good idea is very difficult, and that's what I work hard to do".

In Realizing Good Ideas from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 14Chris Siano shares how he uses digital design and fabricatio to make things better, whether it is a public art installation, a student sculpture project, a building or a neighborhood. For the past twelve years he has served as an Instructional Support Technician in the University at Buffalo Department of Art. In 2005 he formed The Foundry Group Inc. - a company specializing in art and architectural fabrication. And in 2012, in partnership with his brother Matthew, he formed HES Properties - a real estate development company focusing on development of mixed-use properties on Buffalo's West Side. All of these endevours are conduits for great ideas in his community to come to fruition. 

Cover image: Fabricated by Chris Siano and The Foundry Group, Inc., 2015 for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery: Jene Highstein's Black Mound (Turtle).

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Thursday, January 7th, 2016.

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Out of Plane

BY DANIEL VRANA
@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

Daniel Vrana
Adjunct Researcher, 
Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, University at Buffalo
 
The research presented in Daniel Vrana's Out of Plane examines the potential for kinetic expanding geometries to be used as a means of rationalization for complex curvature. Utilizing origami assemblies, a technique of manipulating internal forces acting on individual units is used rather than controlling the system’s form externally, inducing small shifts that inform the larger, global form changes that are able to occur.  
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How One Man on a 75-Pound Bicycle Took a City's Temperature

BY NICHOLAS RAJKOVICH
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"How do we start thinking about heat waves and why are heat waves so important?"

In How One Man on a 75-Pound Bicycle Took a City's Temperature from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Professor, Nicholas B. Rajkovich describes the design of a bicycle-based weather station used to find the “hot spots” of Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Every year in the United States, more people die from heat waves than any other type of natural disaster. Extreme heat events are expected to increase in the future due to climate change. Collecting a fine scale of microclimatic data can help to determine how physical characteristics contribute to human exposure to ground and air temperatures. These data also suggest how urban design strategies can reduce the impacts of the urban heat island effect. However, microclimate measurement poses substantial challenges. Rajkovich’s work investigates the intersection of energy efficient buildings, renewable energy, and climate change resilience.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, June 14th, 2016. 

 

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Design Life

BY PEDRO MANUEL
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"I'm interested in the peaceful, private experience between each piece and its user."

In Design Life from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 16, designer and principal of Manuel Barreto Studio, Pedro Manuel shares a poignant and personal glimpse into his inspiration and practice, from Portugal to Buffalo, exploring how design affects our lives and the relation between the user and the environment.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, August 9th, 2016. 

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A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects

BY ANG LI
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"A wall and a column...what they have in common is an interest in looking at the cultural agency of traditional building materials and their ability to speak."

In A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Peter Reyner Banham Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor Ang Li presents a pair of site specific installations that explore the cultural agency of vernacular building materials. Horror Vacui is an installation in Lisbon, Portugal that examines the ability of building facades to “speak” through the medium of the Portuguese “azulejo” - hand-painted ceramic tiles often depicting scenes from historic or civic events. The piece explores the narrative potential of bricks and mortar within contemporary image sharing and crowdsourcing platforms. No Frills is an installation in Buffalo, New York that stems out of an interest in the industrialized production of terracotta in the 19th century as a new kind of ornamental language. In a semi-abandoned Chevrolet Factory by the architect Albert Kahn, a 13-foot column interrupts the existing grid of the assembly floor,  acting as a bridge between the vast scale of obsolete industry and the human scale of the architectural ornament.

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Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975

BY CHARLES L. DAVIS, II, PH.D.
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"We started with several books that looked at the brownstone as a site of intervention."

In Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975 from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Charles L. Davis, II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, shows works from his recent exhibition project, Building Black Utopias, and discusses the literature that served as inspiration. 

The Building Black Utopias project combines the tools of the architect, the historian and the literary critic to recover the historical contributions of African American writers to architectural utopian thought. It specifically examines the role of literary depictions of place in June Jordan, Amiri Baraka, Paule Marshall and Angela Davis’ writings. Davis argues that each authors’ rhetorical manipulations of the built environment operates on the same level as architectural utopian thought insofar as both mediums created rich, alternative depictions of modernist space to liberate the architect’s imagination. The final exhibit translates the spatial ideas of literature into drawings, models and other ephemera.

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Ceramic Assemblies

BY LIMINAL PROJECTS (OMAR KAHN AND LAURA GARÓFALO)
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"Ask a ceramicist and they will insist that the material lives."

In Ceramic Assemblies from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Laura Garófalo and Omar Kahn of Liminal Projects discuss their prototypes for ceramic building systems that were developed at the European Ceramics Workcentre (ekwc), in Oisterwijk, the Netherlands. They are designs that explore ways that architecture can mediate heat, water and nature. Ceramics, which are fired clay, are one of the oldest building materials. But they defy easy categorization because their behavior and properties are so diverse. Ceramics were used to build the Roman aqueducts and also used for the heat shield on the Space Shuttle. Ask a ceramicist and they will insist that the material lives. It is this quality that Garófalo and Kahn want to capture and perpetuate in their work.

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Collage City

BY JEAN-MICHEL REED
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016.