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PechaKucha Presentation

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Erkin Özay

Assistant Professor, Architecture, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning in Buffalo

"How can we make our endeavors clear and approachable enough that we can actually contribute to the public debate at a very high level?"

In Rethinking Resettlement from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University at Buffalo, Erkin Özay, reviews some of the social and design issues involved in rehousing and supporting Buffalo, New York's new Americans. Özay's Spring 2016 UB graduate studio explored the potential for temporary and long-term housing for newly arrived refugees and immigrants, as well as the role of supporting institutions, community assets, and reimagining the existing housing stock. Özay's project investigates "compassionate urbanism." He is interested in how groups of limited means--new and existing residents--support each other through careful intersections. 

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Planning for a Denser Urban Neighborhood in the Heart of Louisville

BY PATRICK PIUMA
@ VOL 10 ON FEB 05, 2013

Patrick Piuma -- organizer of PKN Louisville -- develops a case for the need for more density in Louisville, particularly a dense, modern neighborhood just south of downtown in an effort to provide more housing options and position Louisville for the new century of global competition for talent and to improve the city's quality of place.

 
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The London Housing Crisis!!

BY DOMINICK VEASEY
@ VOL 10 ON MAY 12, 2016

Dominick Veasey shares his thoughts on the London housing crisis. Veasey is an Associate Director at Planning and Regeneration Consultancy Nexus Planning. While also working in the private sector Dominick has also spent time working in for Central Government looking specifically at how we can ensure more houses are built.

Dominick has extensive experience in preparing and analysing demographic and socio-economic population and household projections, particularly in relation to determining objectively assessed housing need, we will let him explain what that term means.

Let’s get one thing straight from the beginning, Dominick LOVES NUMBERS!

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The Belt Line: Hiding in Plain Sight

BY CHRIS HAWLEY
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"The Belt Line … will be the next phase in Buffalo’s sustainable development."

In The Belt Line: Hiding in Plain Sight from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 16, urbanist and preservationist, Chris Hawley, presents the Belt Line -- one of the most conspicuous and least-known features of Buffalo, NY. Each day, trains go by along it and people drive underneath and over it. It is the "third strand" in Buffalo's DNA, as important to the city's physical and economic geography as Joseph Ellicott's radial and grid plan and Frederick Law Olmsted's park and parkway system; as consequential to the city's development as the Erie Canal and Interstate Highway System.

The Belt Line was opened in 1883, with segments dating back to 1836. The rail line is 15 miles long, forming a continuous loop through Buffaloʼs downtown as well as the prominent industrial loft clusters that it helped to create. Today, the Belt Line's 12 million square feet of largely vacant or underutilized industrial space is the city's next frontier for sustainable development. Factory buildings are being recycled as mixed-use developments. These former industrial areas are becoming walkable centers again.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, July 27th, 2016. 

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Putting a Neighborhood Back Together

BY MADELINE FLETCHER
@ VOL 6 ON JUN 14, 2016

Madeline Fletcher, head of the Newburgh Land Bank, explains how her organization revitalizes neighborhoods block by block in the economically challenged city of Newburgh, NY. 

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Urban Solitudes

BY LAURA PIOVAN
@ VOL 31 ON SEP 07, 2016

What is the future of our cities? In a time of major demographic and fast socio-cultural changes, we are looking for keys to unlock, review and re-interpret the traditional urban housing models into new directions.
A metamorphosis of the housing market from the static individualistic models towards a dynamic, collective synergy.

Laura Piovan is a Italian architect based in Maastricht and has a passion for people and identity driven design.

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Collage City

BY JEAN-MICHEL REED
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016.

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Rethinking the Newark Waterfront

BY JAE SHIN
@ VOL 18 ON MAY 18, 2017

Architectural and urban designer Jae Shin talks in this PechaKucha presentation about how we might advocate for accountable development of our cities through imaginative, community-focused design and planning practices. 

Jae Shin is a partner at Hector, an urban design, planning & civic arts studio, where recent projects have included a memorial for an eco-feminist nun, a riverfront park, and a large-scale exhibition commemorating the 350th anniversary of the founding of Newark, NJ, including a crowd-sourced scale model. Jae has recently served as an Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow at New York City Housing Authority, where she facilitated the agency’s efforts to define and implement design principles for safe, clean and connected communities. As an educator, Jae has led design studios at New Jersey Institute of Technology & Harvard Graduate School of Design.
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Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78

BY FRANK PALEN, ESQ., AICP
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

“Think of me as a time traveler. I’m going to take you back to a place called Buffalo in the 1970s.”

In Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78 from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, attorney and urban renewal advocate, Frank Palen, recalls the creation of a historic district for theatre and culture from a once abandoned rust belt urban core. From 1977 to 1979, Palen was Research Associate in the Center for Community Research and Development at the University at Buffalo’s School of Architecture and Environmental Design, serving as Coordinator of the Buffalo Entertainment District Project. The University at Buffalo’s graduate studio investigated the potential of promoting a theater district in what was then an increasingly abandoned section of Downtown, despite various setbacks and a challenging political climate. The result was a very high-profile effort that set an agenda for the redevelopment of Buffalo that continues today.

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Buffalo Niagara by Design

BY ROBERT G. SHIBLEY
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"What was I thinking when I came to Buffalo? ... I was coming to join a social movement in our city and region, and I dove in head first."

In Buffalo Niagara Design from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Dean and Professor of the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, Robert Shibley, recounts his recruitment to Buffalo as Department Chair, 35 years ago. Upon the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the department, Shibley discusses his work with architecture and planning students, faculty and community members on various urban planning projects in the region. Across an arc of a quarter century, the UB Urban Design Project and the UB Regional Institute have been key players in the evolution of a broad regional planning framework.