WATCH

PechaKucha Presentation

Actor David Duchovny (!) says of Gerard Koeppel's new book: “ I’ve spent most of my life walking the straight lines of the world’s greatest city, and have never thought to ask: Is this a different shape from other cities, and if so, why, and who did it? Koeppel’s book answers these questions, in an easygoing, good-humored manner, with interesting facts unearthed on nearly every page. This is one of those books you always wished would be written, and here it is. Indispensable for anyone interested in the history of New York and cities generally, and bound to fuel cocktail conversations up, down, and across the city for years to come.”

Listen here for a whirlwind history of NY's grid as it develops!

Gerard Koeppel writes history, mostly New York related, but also in anything from magazines and journals to historical signage in city parks. He was also a captain of a charter sailboat, an awful law student, a licensed hack (out of a Greenwich Village taxi garage), and then, for many years, a radio reporter/writer/editor/producer, mostly with CBS News.

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Urban City Development in China

BY THOMAS HUSSEY
@ VOL 25 ON MAR 05, 2013

Thomas Hussey talks about China's current growth in urbanization. Although there are several challenges, such as outdated buildings, over-engineered highways, and pollution to deal with, they hope to redevelop the city, connect cities together, and create new cities entirely that would come to be potential solutions to those probelms. 

"Presentation of the Day" on May 6, 2014. 

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Building a New City on the Waterfront

BY STEPHEN RAINBOW
@ PKN_AKL_SPECIAL EDITION ON MAR 28, 2014

General Manager of Strategy at Waterfront Auckland Stephen Rainbow speaks on the numerous projects that make up the massive redevelopment this port city is undergoing. Industrial parks have been converted to community spaces, housing built on water, innovative commercial and service districts, and sustainable transport options to connect the city.

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Living on the Less Dangerous Edge

BY DARUS ZAHM
@ VOL 5 ON SEP 14, 2015

Darus Zahm wants to live in a world where Phish is always playing in elevators.  When he’s not off communing with nature, you can find him trying to bring the cool back to rollerblading here in Brooklyn.

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Greenspaces in New York

BY GWEN SCHANTZ
@ VOL 7 ON DEC 04, 2015

Gwen Schantz is a Co-Founder of Brooklyn Grange, a renowned urban farming business based in New York City. She spent much of her childhood in her parents’ western Massachusetts vegetable garden, and went on to work on small organic farms in New York State. Her professional background is in international sustainable development and environmental program development, and she is a co-founder of the Bushwick Food Cooperative as well as City Growers, a New York based food and farm education program for children and young adults.

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How New Immigrants Could Build Their New City

BY AMITIS NOUROOZI
@ VOL 10 ON JAN 22, 2016

Within the architecture field, Amitis Nouroozi works in the intersection of planning, design and community-building. She shares her story, as a new immigrant, who is building her new home in the first years of immigration to Canada.

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Bringing a Big Boat Back to Life

BY LIZ MCENANEY
@ VOL 8 ON MAR 04, 2016

Liz McEnaney is an urban historian and preservatioist who has worked in exotic locales such as Maputo, New Delhi, and even New York City! She co-founded BldgBlok - an app that provides tourists with location-based historic content.

Liz's latest restoration project is a big one! The SS Columbia - America's oldest excursion steamship - is making its way back to the Hudson River - listen to her tale of bringing the ship back to life!

Learn more about the SS Columbia project here

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The Belt Line: Hiding in Plain Sight

BY CHRIS HAWLEY
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"The Belt Line … will be the next phase in Buffalo’s sustainable development."

In The Belt Line: Hiding in Plain Sight from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 16, urbanist and preservationist, Chris Hawley, presents the Belt Line -- one of the most conspicuous and least-known features of Buffalo, NY. Each day, trains go by along it and people drive underneath and over it. It is the "third strand" in Buffalo's DNA, as important to the city's physical and economic geography as Joseph Ellicott's radial and grid plan and Frederick Law Olmsted's park and parkway system; as consequential to the city's development as the Erie Canal and Interstate Highway System.

The Belt Line was opened in 1883, with segments dating back to 1836. The rail line is 15 miles long, forming a continuous loop through Buffalo╩╝s downtown as well as the prominent industrial loft clusters that it helped to create. Today, the Belt Line's 12 million square feet of largely vacant or underutilized industrial space is the city's next frontier for sustainable development. Factory buildings are being recycled as mixed-use developments. These former industrial areas are becoming walkable centers again.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, July 27th, 2016. 

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New York: A City of the Living and the Dead

BY ALLISON MEIER
IN NEW YORK

Allison C. Meier is a Brooklyn-based writer focusing on the arts and overlooked history. Currently, she is staff writer atHyperallergic, and moonlights as a cemetery tour guide at New York burial grounds. These tours are focused on cemeteries as places of history, art, and architecture, as well as concerned in keeping our memorial sites visible for preservation and remembrance. At PechaKucha Night NYC Vol 16, Allison discusses these often abandoned and forgotten spaces right in the middle of our bustling city - reminding us the importance of slowing down.

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Collage City

BY JEAN-MICHEL REED
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016.