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PechaKucha Presentation

"Architects are hunters and gatherers." 

In "Foraging and Picking" from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 17, professor of architecture Brian Carter provides a retrospective of twenty postcards from his many travels, highlighting what each image signifies in the mind of an architect. Carter reminds us that architecture can be an international language. It prompts travel, causing us walk into buildings, to meet people, and to listen, sense and smell the places that we go. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Monday, November 21st, 2016. 

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American-Style Architecture

BY MARK CAMPBELL
@ VOL 25 ON MAR 05, 2013

Mark Campbell talks about the history of American-stlye architecture and its origins with a famous architect named Frank Lloyd Wright. Mark talks about how Wright's prairie style houses, that emphaises horizontally shaped houses, an open-planned interior, and copiuos glass windows, have had an empact on architects of the time and on the style of houses created today. 

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Light is the Theme

BY PETRA BACHMAIER
@ AIA 2014 CONVENTION ON JUN 26, 2014

Chicago based artist Petra Bachmaier wows the audience at PechaKucha Night during the American Institute of Architects National Convention in Chicago. She shares her husband/wife collaboration Luftwerkwhich plays with projections on icons of modern architecture after the sun sets.

"Presentation of the Day" on July 10, 2014.

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Nurturing Your Child's Creativity

BY SHARON EXLEY
@ VOL 32 ON DEC 02, 2014

Creativity is a place you and your child should go. 

Sharon Exley presents a top ten of how to nurture creativity, challenge, adventure and more in children, which shows why apples don't fall far from trees (via her own brave and artful explorer Emma).
 
"Presentation of the Day" on January 28, 2015.
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Realizing Good Ideas

BY CHRISTOPHER SIANO
@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

"It's not enough to have a good idea. To realize that good idea is very difficult, and that's what I work hard to do".

In Realizing Good Ideas from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 14Chris Siano shares how he uses digital design and fabricatio to make things better, whether it is a public art installation, a student sculpture project, a building or a neighborhood. For the past twelve years he has served as an Instructional Support Technician in the University at Buffalo Department of Art. In 2005 he formed The Foundry Group Inc. - a company specializing in art and architectural fabrication. And in 2012, in partnership with his brother Matthew, he formed HES Properties - a real estate development company focusing on development of mixed-use properties on Buffalo's West Side. All of these endevours are conduits for great ideas in his community to come to fruition. 

Cover image: Fabricated by Chris Siano and The Foundry Group, Inc., 2015 for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery: Jene Highstein's Black Mound (Turtle).

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Thursday, January 7th, 2016.

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Sharing Landscapes

BY AARON OTT
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"We're increasingly looking at our landscapes in ways that, when we share them, we can also have an active dialogue about how they change."

In Sharing Landscapes from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, Curator of Public Art at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, NY, Aaron Ott, talks about specific examples of public artworks that alter our perception and usage of shared environments. Ott reviews his experience working with the Collections at the Albright-Knox and discusses inspiring works that highlight his interest in creating environmental spaces that reframe our relationship with our shared landscapes.

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A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects

BY ANG LI
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"A wall and a column...what they have in common is an interest in looking at the cultural agency of traditional building materials and their ability to speak."

In A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Peter Reyner Banham Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor Ang Li presents a pair of site specific installations that explore the cultural agency of vernacular building materials. Horror Vacui is an installation in Lisbon, Portugal that examines the ability of building facades to “speak” through the medium of the Portuguese “azulejo” - hand-painted ceramic tiles often depicting scenes from historic or civic events. The piece explores the narrative potential of bricks and mortar within contemporary image sharing and crowdsourcing platforms. No Frills is an installation in Buffalo, New York that stems out of an interest in the industrialized production of terracotta in the 19th century as a new kind of ornamental language. In a semi-abandoned Chevrolet Factory by the architect Albert Kahn, a 13-foot column interrupts the existing grid of the assembly floor,  acting as a bridge between the vast scale of obsolete industry and the human scale of the architectural ornament.

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Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975

BY CHARLES L. DAVIS, II, PH.D.
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"We started with several books that looked at the brownstone as a site of intervention."

In Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975 from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Charles L. Davis, II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, shows works from his recent exhibition project, Building Black Utopias, and discusses the literature that served as inspiration. 

The Building Black Utopias project combines the tools of the architect, the historian and the literary critic to recover the historical contributions of African American writers to architectural utopian thought. It specifically examines the role of literary depictions of place in June Jordan, Amiri Baraka, Paule Marshall and Angela Davis’ writings. Davis argues that each authors’ rhetorical manipulations of the built environment operates on the same level as architectural utopian thought insofar as both mediums created rich, alternative depictions of modernist space to liberate the architect’s imagination. The final exhibit translates the spatial ideas of literature into drawings, models and other ephemera.

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A Brief Memoir of Architectural Space

BY JOANNA GILLESPIE
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"This is my 6-minute memoir. A mediation on impermanence."

In A Brief Memoir of Architecural Space from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, independent arts consultant and co-organizer of PechaKucha Buffalo, Joanna Gillespie, delivers a meditation on twenty of the fifty places she has lived since birth. From Victorian-era structures in Buffalo, NY and San Francisco, CA, to the wilds of the 1970's California coast, to modern and efficient rural Japan, to a Postmodern art utopia in Maine, and beyond, Gillespie recounts a particular memory from each space. Through all of the temporal landscapes we find ourselves in, Gillespie concludes, "We forge on, either clumsily or assuredly. We keep on keeping on." Even if we move fifty times.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016. 

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The Story of Buffalo BookBike

BY AMY OZAY
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

“We need to bring the fun back to reading, and rolling up with a book bike might be a way to do that.” 

In The Story of Buffalo BookBike from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Founder of Buffalo BookBike in Buffalo, NY, Amy Ozay, talks about her love of Buffalo, books, and bikes. Taking inspiration from similar programs in other cities, she launched Buffalo BookBike in 2015, which gives free books to the children of Buffalo in parks and playgrounds throughout the summer months. The BookBike has given away over 1,000 books to date, with the hopes of slowing down the summer slide. Her dream is to increase the reach of the BookBike, foster more collaboration between local literacy organizations, and help convert Buffalo parks to open air libraries in the future. As Cicero wrote, “A room without books is like a body without a soul.”