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PechaKucha Presentation

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Liminal Projects (Omar Kahn and Laura Garófalo)

Laura Garófalo, Principal, Liminal Projects and Associate Professor, UB Department of Architecture, Omar Khan, Principal, Liminal Projects and Associate Professor and Chair, UB Department of Architecture in Buffalo, NY

"Ask a ceramicist and they will insist that the material lives."

In Ceramic Assemblies from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Laura Garófalo and Omar Kahn of Liminal Projects discuss their prototypes for ceramic building systems that were developed at the European Ceramics Workcentre (ekwc), in Oisterwijk, the Netherlands. They are designs that explore ways that architecture can mediate heat, water and nature. Ceramics, which are fired clay, are one of the oldest building materials. But they defy easy categorization because their behavior and properties are so diverse. Ceramics were used to build the Roman aqueducts and also used for the heat shield on the Space Shuttle. Ask a ceramicist and they will insist that the material lives. It is this quality that Garófalo and Kahn want to capture and perpetuate in their work.

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Ceramic travels

BY KARISSA CHASE
@ VOL 5 ON JUN 05, 2014

Karissa Chase is a Townsville girl who fled the city after graduating from high school, moved to Brisbane to study ceramics and hasn't looked back. After deciding to be a potter at the young age of 16, Karissa pursued her dream to do so. After graduating art college in Australia, America gave her the opportunity for love and the chance to introduce her ceramic work. Working with either the wheel or a rolling pin, each piece is not only cute, but how fortunate Karissa is to do what she loves. 

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Sexy and Community

BY KATE MALONE AND STEPHEN PEY
@ MADE IN LONDON ON SEP 17, 2014

Kate Malone and Stephen Pey worked together to create a building with hand made glazed tiles and design. After many trials and errors of cracking ceramic tiles, the finished product was to make something sexy but have the sense of community in the finished building. Which makes the hard work all worth while. 

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Out of Plane

BY DANIEL VRANA
@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

Daniel Vrana
Adjunct Researcher, 
Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, University at Buffalo
 
The research presented in Daniel Vrana's Out of Plane examines the potential for kinetic expanding geometries to be used as a means of rationalization for complex curvature. Utilizing origami assemblies, a technique of manipulating internal forces acting on individual units is used rather than controlling the system’s form externally, inducing small shifts that inform the larger, global form changes that are able to occur.  
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Playing with Colour

BY BACKOFFICE (CORYN KEMPSTER & JULIA JAMROZIK)
@ VOL 15 ON FEB 04, 2016

"Colour often comes down to strategically finding the moments that change in a faster time scale." 

In Playing with Colour from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 15, the artist/designer team of Julia Jamrozik and Coryn Kempster (known as BACKOFFICE) talk about their recent project, LINE GARDEN. In 2014 Jamrozik and Kempster used 500 wooden stakes to weave a mile of colourful plastic barrier tape into an occupiable, abstract field at the International Garden Festival at Reford Gardens/Les Jardins de Métis. They speak about the making of the installation, LINE GARDEN, and it’s adaptation for the 2015 edition of the festival, together with other related projects.

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Design Life

BY PEDRO MANUEL
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"I'm interested in the peaceful, private experience between each piece and its user."

In Design Life from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 16, designer and principal of Manuel Barreto Studio, Pedro Manuel shares a poignant and personal glimpse into his inspiration and practice, from Portugal to Buffalo, exploring how design affects our lives and the relation between the user and the environment.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, August 9th, 2016. 

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A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects

BY ANG LI
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"A wall and a column...what they have in common is an interest in looking at the cultural agency of traditional building materials and their ability to speak."

In A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Peter Reyner Banham Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor Ang Li presents a pair of site specific installations that explore the cultural agency of vernacular building materials. Horror Vacui is an installation in Lisbon, Portugal that examines the ability of building facades to “speak” through the medium of the Portuguese “azulejo” - hand-painted ceramic tiles often depicting scenes from historic or civic events. The piece explores the narrative potential of bricks and mortar within contemporary image sharing and crowdsourcing platforms. No Frills is an installation in Buffalo, New York that stems out of an interest in the industrialized production of terracotta in the 19th century as a new kind of ornamental language. In a semi-abandoned Chevrolet Factory by the architect Albert Kahn, a 13-foot column interrupts the existing grid of the assembly floor,  acting as a bridge between the vast scale of obsolete industry and the human scale of the architectural ornament.

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Return of the Master Builder

BY MATTHEW HUME
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"I tell people I wear two hats—one of the designer and one of the builder, but as I evolve I wish to wear one hat, that of the Master Builder."

In the Return of the Master Builder from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17Adjunct Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning and Owner/Principle of HUME PROJECTS, LLC, Matthew Hume discusses his work creating residential and commercial projects, from the design phase through the construction phase. The traditional Master Builder once integrated both design and construction processes by direct involvement. The profession of architecture and processes of building are shifting back toward a more integrated approach forcing architects to re-evolve into earlier versions of themselves. Hume's recent work in design and construction projects serves as an example of this paradigm shift.

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Collage City

BY JEAN-MICHEL REED
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016.

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Complicating Things: Experimenting with Authority

BY PAUL VANOUSE
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

“I’m a bio media artist. And what that means is I work self-reflexively, with the tools and technologies of the life sciences.” 

In Complicating Things: Experimenting with Authority from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Professor of Art at the University at Buffalo, Paul Vanouse, provides an overview of his work as a bio media artist. As Director of the newly created Coalesce Center for Biological Art at the University at Buffalo, Vanouse works with artists and philosophers and people who wouldn’t normally have a direct connection to do create work in a life sciences laboratory, and is actively engaged with Coalesce’s artist residency program. Vanouse’s own work has recently focused on DNA fingerprinting, removing the inherent layers of authority from DNA with an interest in the very visual representation of DNA. His recent projects, Latent Figure Protocol and Ocular Revision use molecular biology techniques to challenge “genome-hype” and to confront issues surrounding DNA fingerprinting.