PECHAKUCHA DAILY BLOG

PECHAKUCHA DAILY BLOG Posts

"You have to forge meaningful connections with the communities you are in. Ultimately...we want everything we do to matter to the people in this town."

In Rethinking the Role of the Orchestra from PechaKucha Night San Antonio Vol. 21, Conductor Troy Peters poses the question, "How does one know a good orchestra?" He thinks your neighborhood policeman just might know the answer.



"I was really interested in the challenge of replicating these textrues, patterns, and forms of meteorites."

For Matthew Cummings, artwork has always been personal journey for escape and meditation in both the making process and viewing.  "The Moon is my Scholar Rock" from PechaKucha Night Knoxville Vol. 18 is a look at the work from his last solo exhibition, 'The Moon is my Gongshi'.  This group of work examined the moon as an object of meditation, the tradition of Chinese Scholar Rocks or Gongshi, and the inspiring career of his grandfather-in-law, Charles Bradshaw, who ran the computations department for NASA during the development of Rocket Technology. 



"I wasn't worrying about money anymore ... by keeping money out of the social relationships, I also engaged entirely different with the people around me. It was just a much more natural way of being and it released a lot of freedom which was translated into creative expression."

In Handlettered Signboards from PechaKucha Night Leiden Vol 15Lilian Leahy shares quitting her job to trade it for a backpack, sketchbook, pencils, paint and brushes. She travelled for more than a year through South East Asia and India. In more than 100 illustrations she documented her experiences. She also handlettered signboards for guesthouses resorts and restaurants in exchange for food and accomodation and that is how she was able to afford a long time of travelling. www.lilianleahy.com



Boyne, Keith, and Tania (and pup, 'Tropical Charlie'): PechaKucha's Organizers in sunny Townsville, Queensland. Living as architects, working as farmers, studying as scholars, and creating as poets and artists, this laid back funky bunch stays well off the beaten path, and engaged everyday with beauty, fragility, and inspiration that Coral Sea and it's treasured Great Barrier Reef brings to their shores. Keeping their hands to the dirt, irons to the fire, and spirit to the winds, they bring intention to their unique PKNs in Townsville, focusing in on preservation, conservation, and living in harmony with the landscape, and it's inhabitants.

And no PKN is complete without a committee (read: community)! Big shout out to Sandy McCathie, Yoshie Kenny, Kaz Hauser and Karen Metcalfe, and don't forget Dave Sewell, pizza cook extraordinaire! Thank you all for everything you do to bring the spirit of PechaKucha to Townsville!



This week's City Focus, heads to a city that turns purple every year with the blossoming of Jacaranda Trees, Zimbabwe's capital, and PK newcomer Harare who hosted their first PKN last week! Check out many of their smiling faces now up in the City Slider section of the front page. Welcome to the Family Harare!

"It's a bit embarrassing to talk about the tools like this, but this comes back to, after using 1000's of cameras, what I think the best camera is. I think the best camera is...."

What's the best camera ever made? Notorious photography hack and noted local yokel, Brian Scott Peterson ought to know. After all, in the course of 20 years of making photos, nearly 1000 cameras and lenses, have passed through his possession. In "The Best Camera" from PechaKucha Night Tokyo Vol. 132, he shares some musings on the most treasured of his arguably modest collection, focussing in on the very best one.


“In a lot of ways, the most significant things I have learned have come from experience. In that experience I discovered that there can be both harm and value in speaking and listening, thinking and acting. ”

In Retreating Into Silence from PechaKucha Dubuque Volume 2, Speaker Kelly Larson takes us on a journey to explore how she is learning to balance thinking, listening, speaking and acting. She weaves in stories from family, friends, and co-workers around this exciting presentation!


“There are stories after stories of young children who are already missing permanent teeth because their moms had pulled them because the excruciating pain was too much to bear. ”

Restless in her day-to-day profession of dental hygienist, Annie Nardone found a way to create more meaningful work for herself while still using her expertise in dentistry. In PechaKucha Night Batavia’s 1st volume, she discusses how she created Hands with Hope, a not-for-profit foundation, to deliver training, dental treatment, equipment, and supplies to impoverished communities in Central America. Currently, Hands with Hope maintains and supports three fully functioning dental clinics in Honduras and Guatemala, which are run and operated by locally trained individuals eager to serve their communities.


“As designers people often ask us ‘what do designers do?’. Can we define what we do? Lets try.”

In Is There A Place Where the Sidewalk Ends from PechaKucha Portland Volume 14, Speakers and Landscape architects Miguel Camacho-SernaAzas Sadjadi, and Chanelle Wiley poetically discuss design. From the unclear beginnings and endings, roles and structures, and the importance of connections, the three explain the intricacies of influences to the creative process.



"Designing is the art of using forethought. If you make it up on the spot, that's not design, that's Jazz.'"

In Product Design A to Z from PechaKucha Night New Westminster Vol. 4, Lead Product Designer at lighting manufacturer, Fluxworks Illumination, Daniel Fortin walks us through the process of taking an idea, LED design in this case, through its myriad stages of development before it hits production and tells us why we need to pay closer attention to the products we surround ourselves. 

VIEW MORE

Friends of PechaKucha