Next Event

20 OCT


Volume 34 | City Builders showcases young, creative city builders – those working on, responding to, advocating for, and imagining our fine city. This Volume advances the idea that a project doesn’t need to be large scale and expansive to have transformational impact. We’ve put together an exciting line-up of city builders who are giving something to the city, provoking change, starting conversations, and making the streets more animated and beautiful. So we ask, “What have you done for Toronto lately?”  

We’re hosting at Rally on Ossington at Queen, a new experimental, mixed-use space conceptualized and operated by Hermann & Audrey. We could not be more excited to be part of the launch of such an innovative space that rethinks life at grade. 

You’ll hear from Brandon Donnelly, creator of Architect This City, Mackenzie Keast, Partner at Distl., Natasa Kajganic, Founder of the Toronto Flower Market, Jay Wall, Creative Director at Studio JAYWALL, artists Justin Broadbent and Sean Martindale, Behnaz Assadi, Partner at Ja Architecture Studio, Anna Hill and Minaz Asani-Kanji with outreach at Park People, and Jason Eano, senior producer and strategist at Hermann & Audrey.


Featured Presentation


Maryam Nabavi

Strategist, Idea Couture in Toronto

Maryam Nabavi, an Innovation Strategist at Idea Couture, talks about her strategy for the future of commerical space (i.e. Virgin Galactic) as a service industry. If you ever thought about living in space, then small bathrooms, carbon-dehydrated food, and uncomfortable sleeping arrangements are probably not what you had in mind. However, Nabavi redesigned the experience to have humans at the center of the problem so that it can be an enjoyable and memorable experience for anyone no matter their financial or physical situation. 

"Presentation of the Day" on February 4, 2014.


Goddesses and the colours

@ VOL 32 ON JAN 20, 2015

Enuma Flux sings songs that portray the color of history most famous Women Goddesses. Her music encourages and inspires younger women in her community to continue with their musical talent. 


Zones of Immersion

@ VOL 32 ON JAN 20, 2015

Stuart Reid creates amazing and colorful murals inspired by the people in local subway stations. His huge portraits are now hung at subway stations. Stuart mural projects have colored and brighten up many dull subway stations. 


Aesthetic impact of colour

@ VOL 32 ON JAN 20, 2015

Colour is one of the primary inspirational cornerstones that drive artists. Using examples from her own work and from familiar masters, Lorette C. Luzajic takes us on an emotional journey exploring the aesthetic impact of colour on artists and their audience. 


Colour Decoded

@ VOL 32 ON JAN 20, 2015

A surgery removing a tumour along with half of Carly Blackman's thyroid in 2012 was the beginning of a 2-year journey of researching, writing and designing her book called Colour Decoded. This is a book written for artists and designers explaining the science behind colour in a way a "right-brained" individual can easily understand. Furthermore it discusses how colour has a massive impactive on our hormones, body and behaviours. Her exploration with colour tries to bridge the two worlds of Art and Science, which have been isolated from each other in our present day education system. 

"Presentation of the Day" on February 10, 2015.


What Colour is Your Blood?

@ VOL 32 ON JAN 20, 2015

Colour plays many roles in medical and anatomical illustration: representational and symbolic, qualitative and quantitative, diagnostic and aesthetic. While some colour choices may seem obvious (such as red to represent blood), there is much more history, nuance and interpretation than meets the eye. Amongst other topics, Dave Mazierski presented the five different colours of blood, the wheel of urine, and the truth behind the real and imagined colours of our inner and outer anatomy.


Colour at the Ontario Science Centre

@ VOL 32 ON MAY 06, 2014

Colour at the Ontario Science is an integral part of our vision since our opening in 1969.  From the three hues in our iconic logo, to use in defining architecture and way finding, colour assists 1 million visitors a year setting the stage for interactives and copy panels in our halls.  Colour changes in response to our needs, but also helps define interactions, resolve questions and enhance the visitor experience. Elgin Cleckley, Senior Exhibit Designer of the Science Centre, takes a quick tour of the Ontario Science Centre discussing the colour histories of the past and how they have evolved into the colour language we use today. 


In Living Colour

@ VOL 32 ON JAN 20, 2015

We are closed off from the world when we are in our own comfort zone/natural environment; thus, traveling helps us to see the world in a new light. In this presentation, Alex Hugh shares how traveling helps us to open our eyes to the unknown and expand our perceptions with vibrant ideas and radiant images to help enhance and better our daily lives.


Gamification of our Everyday

@ VOL 31 ON DEC 04, 2014

Matthew Rosenberg, an architect at M-Rad based in LA predicts our future will become somewhat of a peewee's playhouse. He believes gamifying our everyday life can induce people to live a more meaningful life. In this presentation, he takes us through a few examples of digital and physical projects that use gaming to solve global issues.

"Presentation of the Day" on March 31, 2015.



Gamification of our Everday

Can gamifying our everyday tasks make us more productive?
Matthew Rosenberg, an architect at Los Angeles-based firm M-Rad predicts our future will become somewhat of a peewee’s playhouse. In “Gamification of our Everyday” from PKN Toronto Vol. 31 we see that He believes gamifying our everyday life can induce people to live a more meaningful life. Matthew takes us through a few examples of digital and physical projects that use gaming to solve global issues.

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About the City's Organizers

  • Amy Bath

    Toronto-based, Vancouver-raised communications aficionado, part writer, part strategist, with a particular interest in community building for better cities. She writes a blog called Comrades based on her contention that camaraderie breeds stronger communities, benefits the public good, makes everyday life a little better, advances brands, and bolsters the bottom line, whether monetary or a mission. She makes a lot of lists, buys (and increasingly borrows) more books than she has time to read, and laughs a lot.

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