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City Focus: San Francisco

After a bit of a hiatus, one of our longest running series is back in San Francisco, and so we celebrate with a "City Focus." If you're in town, make sure to check out this week's PechaKucha Night Vol. 54 on March 26 -- you can visit the official event page for all the details.

Time just carries on with its tireless march forward and -- wow, just like that -- it's November! You know what that means: we have a fresh, steaming, stuffing-filled cornucopia of presentations for you (with a side of cranberry sauce)!

Here are the Top 5 Presentations of the Day for the month of October 2013: 

"Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time" by Kate Garmey.

"Introversion" by Caleb Keller.

"Human Trafficking" by Ali Weiner.

"Fear. Pain. Humor." by Mark Rickmeier.

"The San Francisco of Tomorrow" by Craig Scott.

As if the Bay Area weren't futuristic enough!

In today's Presentation of the Day, "The San Francisco of Tomorrow" from PKN San Francisco Vol. 53, architect Craig Scott proposes ideas for putting three of San Francisco's abandoned buildings to new and innovative new uses.

Old silos are transformed into a gigantic 3D printer, a decrepit crane is turned into a digital technology innovation lab, and an unused stadium is turned into a greenhouse.

Whether it be built of glass, poured-in-place concrete, or steel I-beams, the big bad whole may huff and puff, but he'll never blow these structures down. These are the top 5 PechaKucha 20x20 presentations related to buildings, construction, and architecture. 

First, we hear from Gary Cheng, whose tiny Hong Kong apartment has innumerable transmutations. (Transformer Apartment) Then we listen to Bob Berkebile's experiences with failure, and how it drove him to improve upon the architectural status quo. (Failure)

Filipe Balestra discusses the importance of placement when constructing public works projects in urban villages. (Acupuncture Architecture, Urban Villages) Emma Brooke then takes us on a tour through the harsh, unfeeling (yet somehow beautiful) world of brutalist architecture. (Brutalism)

And as a bit of a crossover with last week's top 5 of the animal kingdom, Roland Hagenberg describes the construction of a house meant for humans and a feathered friend. (Storkhouse)

PechaKucha San Francisco organizer Paul Jamtgaard is helping to promote a design competition in Salt Lake City, and he's got all the details right here:

Who doesn't love zip lines? We've proposed a rooftop PechaKucha surrounded by the Salt Lake City downtown skyline with millions of stars above!  Other interventions: new arts and performance spaces and parking-structure-rooftop sustainable farming in the area are all connected by a network of zip lines making everyone feel like a Superman/woman.

For more details on this competition, check out the SixtyNine | Seventy Project. (photo credit: Trevor Muhler Photography)

This being our anniversary week -- PechaKucha is 10 years old! -- our "Presentations of the Day" will feature some of the most popular presentations we've had on the site. How could a man witness the fatal failure of a bridge in the Hyatt Regency Hotel, which killed 114 people, designed by his own firm, and then become one of the founders of the US Green Building Council, and have a profound impact on how our buildings impact the entire planet? The theme for this presentation is "failure."

In April 2009, this was a theme everyone was confronting in one way or another. Bob Berkebile came to this event fully aware of how failures -- some his own, others he merely witnessed -- have the potential to shape lives for the better. During the course of his 20 slides, he expresses in a very uniquely personal way the mindset and imagination necessary to see failures as the opportunities for insight that they can be.