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“Only those who have been excluded, singled out, and pushed out of society, have the credentials to speak truth about it.”


In Time, Space, and Playing Fields from PechaKucha Night New Orleans Vol. 11, artist Abdi Farah talks about his work in relation to his journey from studying art in college to being named the winner of the inaugural season of Bravo’s "A Work of Art." He continues his passion for art in New Orleans seeking kindred spirits through an exploration of metaphysical and imaginary worlds and sports. 

"Presentation of the Day" on February 25, 2015 and again on December 24th as part of our Star Wars themed newsletter - goo.gl/e1clE7




"We wanted every design decision that we made to be affordable, made locally, and something that could teach a skill."

In Community Participation and Architecture, from PechaKucha Night New Orleans, Vol. 17, architect Mary Gilmore, shares her master’s thesis on Community Participation and Architecture. Her belief is that if people participated in the design and construction of a building, not only will they become stake holders in the process, but also learn something.  To put her thesis into practice, Mary moved to India and then later to Mali, West Africa with the Peace Corps.  Now as a practicing architect here in the states, she is has rediscovered the notion of community participation and architecture.




"This is the first color newspaper ever printed in New Orleans!"

In I'd Rather Be Printing from Pechakucha Night New Orleans Vol. 17, J.S. Makkos shares falling in love with antique printing presses as a youth exploring in his father’s antique shop. This helped define his passion for print making. He came down to New Orleans with a purpose to salvage the detritus and material culture of this city that was being lost in dumpsters and through a sequence of events, stumbled on a treasure trove of New Orleans history.




"Upon seeing the green vase, I was speechless. It was wrapped in newspaper dated from 1970 and had been in the attic the entire time. It was a one of a kind piece, and no one knew it existed. After all the wasted trips and false alarms, here I was with one of the greatest discoveries of cut glass."

Franz Hellwig is an avid collector of American Brilliant Cut Glass, an art form and product popular in the United States from 1876-1916. In The Hunt for American Brilliant Cut Glass from New Orleans Vol. 7, Franz shares with us a bit of the history and methods used by the American artisan to create these pieces of art. Today Franz is considered one of the foremost experts of American Brilliant Cut Glass and travels across the country in search for his next piece.





"I realised that really I just want everything to be fun ...all the time."

In Turn Off To Tune In from New Orleans, Vol. 13, Artist, animator, Gallery Assistant at The Foundation Gallery in New Orleans, Alice McGillicuddy, talks about her process to find fun and to get into the mind frame to create.  Alice is the happiest creating structures, large and small, to house animations and enjoys making every sort of bit and bob.

After you watch this fun presentation, be inspired to DO!




This week we're putting our "City Focus" on PKN New Orleans, which is always working hard to bring the PechaKucha spirit to their lovely city. Check out their presentation archive and keep your eyes peeled for their Vol. 17 coming up this week!

Our bodies act as a shared experience, and death is the one unifying conclusion.

Abdi Farah contemplates what it means to be and artist. In “Time, Space, and Playing Fields” from PKN New Orleans Vol. 11, he discusses his passion for art in New Orleans, and seeking kindred spirits through an exploration of metaphysical and imaginary worlds and sports. 


Make sure you have creative 20/20 vision by attending New Orleans' PechaKucha Night Vol. 15 on February 3 (see full poster here). You'll find more PKN flyers/posters over at our Tumblr.

Architects are teams of people that come together; designers, builders, community members, all as a collective whole.

Architect Emilie Taylor speaks the public perceptions of the architect’s role, and goes into depth on a few of the wonderful projects she has worked on. In “Making Something Greater” from PKN New Orleans Vol. 14, Emilie shares how she views architecture as the culmination of something that is greater than any one person’s achievement.

On comedy and math: “Why take something people love and introduce it to something people hate?”

University mathematics professor Cory Dumesnil is also into improvisation comedy. In “Improvometrics” from PKN New Orleans Vol. 13 he speaks about his efforts to bridge the opposing forces of math and comedy.

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