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The Fragrant City

 Tanja Schell shows how powerful one of our most ignored senses is. We live in a world of scents. And we are influenced by them 24/7. All those scents influence our mood and our wellbeing, all of them. Even those we are not aware of. Scent is a hidden but powerful dimension which adds a strong sense of place to the urban space, it makes cities more attractive and more safe. After ages of reducing and controlling odour emissions in the city, time has come to develop a positive policy to use this invisible power.

Another successful edition of PechaKucha at Maastricht School of Management


“PechaKucha teaches us four important skills in management,” said Oliver Olson, director of Global Education, as he opened the fourth annual edition of MSM goes PechaKucha on Friday 17 March. “1. Following rules, 2. Being concise, 3. Public speaking, 4. Improvisation” Its strict format – 20 slides, 20 second per slide – forces you to think carefully about your message and to stay focused. At the same time, it allows you to practice your presentation and public speaking skills, and develop perhaps the most important one, which will help you throughout life in any situation, the skill of improvisation.”

Stimulated by these encouraging words, no less than 11 MBA and MM students took the PechaKucha stage at MSM in front of a full audience of staff, students, friends, family members and MSM stakeholders.

As always at MSM, their stories came from all over world, from Kenya to Peru, from Greece to Vietnam, from India to Chile and more. The students talked about topics that mattered to them and transformed the way they saw the world and the future, and the common point between all their stories was that although personal, they all had a deeper and universal value and meaning. We heard about what we can learn from observing birds in a city like Lima, how the financial crisis in Greece led to the development of new business ideas, why we should thank our enemies, the power of relationships, a successful financial product made in Kenya, and why education and life-long learning are key to making the world a better place.

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The PechaKucha team in Maastricht complimented the students on their excellent choice of topics and slides. The strength of the PechaKucha format lies in the combination of an authentic message and powerful images. The presenters scored high on these points, whilst keep their own presentation and delivery style. Some used humor, others metaphors, some walked up and down the stage, others asked questions to the audience. The dynamic and engaging pace of the presentations lifted everyone’s spirits on this Friday afternoon.

The event, perfectly organized by Pilar Gonzalez, ended – how else? – with a brilliant improvisation on random slides by Oliver Olson himself, who took the PechaKucha standards to yet a higher presentation level under huge laughter and applause from the public.

All presentations will be online soon, don’t miss them!

 

By Sueli Brodin

A Researcher Gone Practical


"I started teaching, because I try to make students be able to apply their research, understand what it can mean for business."

In "A Researcher Gone Practical" from PechaKucha Night Maastricht Vol. 31Tessa van Asselt explains why academic insights should be used for business, and how research can be practically applied to business strategy. Tessa recalls the challenges she faced while trying to apply her research knowledge and methonds to a real-world project, and shares her passion about teaching and helping students to make links between research and business.

"Some memories actually emerge to protect us from danger."

in "Can Memory be Restored?" from PechaKucha Night MaastrichtVol.31, researcher from Germany at Maastricht University,Sarah-Anna Hescham wants to show us new ways that are being explored to deal with and even restore memory loss. Remembering and forgetting are two important sides of the same coin that help us manage our day to day lives. We do not need to remember everything, just what is important. But for some people, especially older people, forgetfulness can happen more often... Is there a cure?

The Teacher Who Learned to Listen


"Teaching isn’t just about bestowing substantive knowledge to students. It’s about teaching them and giving them experiences that Google can’t."

It is easy to grasp the concept that communication is a two-way street but how many of us really put the theory into practice? How easily do we fall on the default of just trying to put our point across, specially if we think about education?

Mark Kawakami is passionate about teaching and also describes himself as a failed comedian. In The Teacher Who Learned to Listen from PechaKucha Night Maastricht Vol. 31, he shared what conclusion he came to over the years of teaching.

"How did we get to grow mushroom on used coffee grounds?"

In "Growing Mushrooms in Coffee" from PechaKucha Night Maastricht Vol.30, as an event organizer and urban farmer Alexander Elichner tells us the story behind his ideas and ways to grow mushroom on used coffee grounds. He give us the tips and how to applies a sustainable and circular approach to farming! Do you want to find out how? 

Simple as ABC, Art for Behavioural Change!


“Somehow as we grow up, art disappears out of our lives. This is the story of how art reentered mine.”

In "Simple as ABC, Art for Behavioural Change!", from PechaKucha Night Maastricht Vol. 31, Prof. Shyama Ramani addressed the major problems of Indian villages - open defecation and littering of public spaces. Policy makers are helplessly wondering how to bring about behavioural change. Shyama proposed that communal art forms can be used as an instrument of behavioural change. How? Listen to this talk to find out.

Prof. Shyama Ramani of UNU-MERIT has been voted one of the #100 Women Achievers of India in the category of ‘Hygiene and Sanitation’.

"People were interested not about only the food that it was made, but also the backgroud from where did it come from."

In "When Food Brings Cultures Together" from PechaKucha Night Maastricht Vol.31Sonia Kar is an independent entrepreneur who tells us the idea about her online platform, where different cultures meet through their menus. We human beings are very different, each and every one of us have some principles and values in us which have been influenced by our family, culture, upbringing and country. We all are effectively ambassadors or representatives of our families, cultural backgrounds and countries. But how often do we share our culture or are aware about the culture of others and can this be done through our food?


“At the end, I want to stress… You, you can save someone’s life. You can save someone loved’s life.”


In honor of the International Restart a Heart Day, let us recall a great presentation by Jules Olsthoorn - Resuscitation A Basic Skill For All, from PechaKucha Night Maastricht Vol. 27th. Jules discusses Keep the Heartbeat Going, an organization dedicated to educating the public about CPR. The first six minutes after a heart attack is a crucial time, and it is imperative that one knows how to resuscitate a loved one should they ever be put in such a situation. A medical student in Maastricht, Jules spends most of his time at Taskforce QRS Maastricht, an organisation that promotes and facilitates resuscitation education in the Netherlands.

"How many gems of scientific discovery are out there, published in articles, that we don’t know about?"

One of the goals of scientific research should be the improvement of the human reality. But have we created a world in which the journey from discovery to society is so exhausting that it deters academics from embarking on it? And if so, can we do something about it?

In "From Science to Society: A Field full of Landmines" from PechaKucha Night Maastricht Vol. 31, Bart Knols discusses how scientists need to better communicate with those who are outside their field in order to contribute to society's development.

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