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"...because sometimes I think the picture isn't ready yet."

In A Brief History of Polyptych Art, from Maastricht Vol. 26Said ten Brinke explores the idea of Polyptich Art, the use of two, three, or more works of art to create a multiple array that becomes a unique piece itself, often with a new context.

Some of the oldest known works of the Late Roman Empire are diptychs, a form that continued through the Renaissance and on to today in modern art by artistis such as Andy Warhol and Francis Bacon. Said ten Brinke ends his presentation with a series of self created photo-polyptychs. Check it out!


When Life Gives You Lemons

“Even if the lemons are really big, and really sour…”

Nadine Boesten tells the inspiring story of how epileptic stress-induced seizures have affected her life in both negative and positive manners. In "When Life Gives You Lemons" from PKN Maastricht Vol. 26, she shows us how to turn a journey of despair into hope; 'how to turn lemons into lemonade.' 

The Future of Cancer Care

“With all these innovations, we’re left with a larger rate of cancer survivors.”

Due to considerable progress in cancer treatment and survival rates, the population of cancer survivors can be anticipated to keep expanding in the foreseeable future. Though these patients may be cured of their original disease, survivors often have a to deal with a compromised quality of life. In “The Future of Cancer Care” from PKN Maastricht Vol. 24, Anna Verhulst, a fifth-year medical student and a cancer rehabilitation researcher, proposes a entirely new way of looking at cancer survivorship and rehabilitation programs.

Following the success of last year’s PechaKucha event to welcome the New Year at MSM, three groups from the MBA31 class once again bravely accepted the challenge to present their dreams, projects and visions to staff, friends, and MSM’s local partners and stakeholders by using the powerful PechaKucha format.

Devised by Klein Dytham Architecture in Tokyo in 2003 as a fast-paced presentation format to showcase new ideas, the PechaKucha concept is simple yet effective: each speaker shows 20 slides, each for 20 seconds. PechaKucha events are now happening in 800 cities across the globe and have grown into valued platforms for inspiration, creativity and networking.

On Friday 16 January, four beautiful African business-minded women : Ms. Rebecca Freda Namagga (Uganda), Ms. Amina Mahamudu Serwenda (Tanzania), Ms. Oluwabunmi Folowosele and  Ms. Olanike Omobolanle Ojo (both from Nigeria) shared their entrepreneurial ambitions and shared their visions on women empowerment in Africa with great conviction. They were followed by Yosief Iyassu (Eritrea), Emmanuel Balele (Tanzania) and James Bamwete (Uganda) who described the deplorable health and environment effects caused by the use of inefficient traditional charcoal cooking stoves in Africa and showed how the situation could considerably improve by replacing them with energy saving clay-based cooking stoves. Presenting last, Eleftheria Sitara from Greece gave a very personal story of her journey into the MBA program at MSM and how studying with fellow students from 22 different nationalities has brought a new meaning to the word “beauty” for her.

Eleftheria said she found it an unforgettable learning experience:

“When I first heard about the PechaKucha concept, I thought of a double-edged sword. Based on the power of images – that sometimes may be equal to a thousand words – PechaKucha allows presenters to express themselves concisely but still in a rich and creative way. The greatest challenge though is picking up the appropriate structure and content for your presentation in order to deliver your message to the audience in the most efficient way.

My idea was to present a topic regarding ‘beauty’ and the unexpected ways in which I discovered it through my experiences. The reason I selected it was because I wanted to present not only a brief description of my personal attitude towards life, but also because I wanted to express publicly my gratitude for all the precious moments I am currently sharing with my international classmates.

Social Media Maastricht School of Management

Although in the beginning I was thinking that the PechaKucha challenge was far too fresh and uncomfortable for me to engage in, from the moment I entered the room I felt an immediate friendliness. During my presentation I saw people’s nods and smiles, showing that they were eager to listen to what I was saying. That sense of encouragement from the audience to whom you express your inner ideas is a remarkable feeling that can hardly be forgotten. Relying on the inspiring feedback I received from people telling me how much they were touched and surprised by the spirit created through the single means of a presentation, I would definitely recommend to everyone to try the PechaKucha experience even just for once in their lifetime.”

Just like last year, the audience enthusiastically reacted to the students’ presentations. The event was followed by a friendly and relaxed network session in the Business Lounge with all participants.

After months of undiagnosed postpartum depression, Becky Castle Miller experienced an emotional breakdown.

In “This is What Going Crazy Feels Like” from PKN Maastricht Vol. 24, we see that after 2 years of hard work battling depression, Becky came through with renewed sense of self, and now has launched an online magazine dedicated to combatting the stigma surrounding mental health issues.

When Eve took the apple, she said to Adam, “I want to think for myself.”

Ellen ter Gast tells us that ethical heroism is what we need most in this world. In “Bold Ethics” from PKN Maastricht Vol. 24, Ellen shows us that the right thing to do isn’t always the easy thing to do — especially when it means leaving behind our previously-held beliefs.

If a 4000-pound bronze bell isn’t heavy metal, what is?

Orchestral violinist Frank Steijns travels the world to play music, but also plays the carillon bells (the Netherlands’ national, traditional instrument) in the tower of Maastricht’s city hall.

In “Keep Calm and Carillon” from PKN Maastricht Vol. 24 Frank tells us he’s “a DJ with a very nice instrument,” how he has taken bells out of the tower, and is now playing for audiences.


For our first City Focus of the year, we head to Maastricht, Netherlands, where the last event alone -- December's Vol. 24 -- added twelve new presentations to the city's already extensive presentation archives.

3D printing has is an awesome tool for designers working in fashion.

Rik Theunissen specializes in some really fantastic, unique projects. In “How 3D Printing Gave Me a Ride2 Fashion Week” from PKN Maastricht Vol. 23 he presents his design for large, randomly-generated crystals worn and shown at Amsterdam Fashion Week.

“In order to survive the orchestra needs to search for a balance between artistic tradition and economic reason.”

Director General and Artistic Director for the South Netherlands Philharmonic Stefan Rosu knows that the classical symphony orchestra is facing dramatic change in recent years.

In “The Orchestra in Transition” from PKN Maastricht Vol. 23, Stefan shows us that orchestras must adapt to survive, and he goes into depth on how it can do so without losing its essence in the process.

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Friends of PechaKucha

Friends of PechaKucha