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Not yet scheduled!

We haven’t scheduled our next PechaKucha Night yet, but in the meantime you can watch some presentations, look at our map to see if there are any scheduled PKNs in nearby cities, or have a look at the long list of upcoming events, to see if there’s one you can attend!

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Featured Presentation

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Shyama Ramani

Professional Fellow, United Nation University MERIT in Maastricht

In Indian villages, open defecation and littering of public spaces are major problems. Policy makers are helplessly wondering how to bring about behavioural change. We propose that communal art forms can be used as an instrument of behavioural change. How? Listen to this talk to find out.

Prof. Shyama Ramani of UNU-MERIT has been voted one of the #100 Women Achievers of India in the category of ‘Hygiene and Sanitation’, as part of a contest organised by the Indian Ministry of Women and Child Development in partnership with Facebook in early 2016.

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Can Memory be Restored?

BY SARAH-ANNA HESCHAM
@ VOL 31 ON SEP 07, 2016

Remembering and forgetting are two important sides of the same coin that help us manage our day to day lives. We do not need to remember everything, just what is important. But for some people, especially older people, forgetfulness can happen more often... Is there a cure?

Sarah-Anna Hescham is a researcher from Germany at Maastricht University and she wants to show us new ways that are being explored to deal with and even restore memory loss.

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When Food Brings Cultures Together

BY SONIA KAR
@ VOL 31 ON SEP 07, 2016

 

In When Food Brings Cultures Together from PechaKucha Night Masstricht Vol.31Sonia Kar is an independent entrepreneur who tells us the idea about her online platform, where different cultures meet through their menus. 

We can easily see mealtimes as a moment when our family gets together and share our experiences. But as a whole, we human beings are very different, each and every one of us have some principles and values in us which have been influenced by our family, culture, upbringing and country. We all are effectively ambassadors or representatives of our families, cultural backgrounds and countries. But how often do we share our culture or are aware about the culture of others and can this be done through our food?

 

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Urban Solitudes

BY LAURA PIOVAN
@ VOL 31 ON SEP 07, 2016

What is the future of our cities? In a time of major demographic and fast socio-cultural changes, we are looking for keys to unlock, review and re-interpret the traditional urban housing models into new directions.
A metamorphosis of the housing market from the static individualistic models towards a dynamic, collective synergy.

Laura Piovan is a Italian architect based in Maastricht and has a passion for people and identity driven design.

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The Magic Lantern

BY DAVID DEPREZ
@ VOL 31 ON SEP 07, 2016

"It is so important that as a student you go out of your comfort zone, out of the faculty, out of your student house - because its the only way to connect to the city."

What is 'cinema' all about and how can 'a cinema' canbe a natural intersection for informal learning and entertainment, for art and science, for students and city?

In "The Magic Lantern" from PechaKucha Night Maastricht Vol. 31David Deprez addresses these questions. As an artistic director of Lumière Cinema Maastricht, David plans to involve students in the programming and using films in their academic curricula at Maasstricht University. 

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The Teacher Who Learned to Listen

BY MARK KAWAKAMI
@ VOL 31 ON SEP 07, 2016

It is easy to grasp the concept that communication is a two-way street but how many of us really put the theory into practice? How easily do we fall on the default of just trying to put our point across, specially if we think about education.

Mark Kawakami is passionate about teaching and also describes himself as a failed comedian. In both cases what is the place for a conversation?

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A Researcher Gone Practical

BY TESSA VAN ASSELT
@ VOL 31 ON SEP 07, 2016

As a researcher gone practical, Tessa van Asselt explains why academic insights should be used for business, and how research can be practically applied to business strategy.

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Give Change a Hug

BY JAY XIE
@ VOL 31 ON SEP 07, 2016

This new globalised and connected world means that not only ideas and people can move around but also business. The same way that a tourist needs to understand foreign cultures, business also needs to adapt. How can a foreign brand be revamped with local tastes?

Jing Jay Xie will show how passion, expertise and a positive approach are needed in the carry-on luggage of a globally-connected entrepreneur.

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Local Markets, Global Interactions

BY LAUREN WAGNER
@ VOL 31 ON SEP 07, 2016

Commerce is so ubiquitous that we do not even see it as a center for the exchange of goods and ideas. Are the market places the hearts of the cities that pump and distribute the flow of human activity or the brain where the personality of a city resides?

Lauren Wagner is an Assistant Professor in Globalisation and Development and shares her work on social and linguistic encounters in the Maastricht market.

 

MAASTRICHT Blog

My 6 minutes and 40 seconds at PechaKucha!

 
 
 
 
 
A beautiful testimonial by PechaKucha presenter Sonia Kar 
So it began! The moment had come for me to take the stage. Rodrigo, one of the enthusiastic hosts of the evening, had started giving a grand introduction about what I was going to speak about in the next 6 minutes and 40 seconds on PechaKucha Maastricht Vol 31, being held at the prestigious Sint Janskerk. What would I say? Would I be able to keep pace with the 20 seconds timer on each slide or would I just make a mess of it? Would I be able to convey my story effectively?
Actually all these questions crossed my mind some two months ago when I heard about PechaKucha 20X20 presentation format using picture slides. Bit intimidating that one has to convey adequately in 20 slides with a 20 sec/slide speed, but the concept was so terrific that I had to give it a try. My application as a guest speaker took some screening considering PechaKucha was celebrating the 40th anniversary of Maastricht University. However I handled the screening questions with the same passion as I would be doing while speaking (I in fact felt I was already on stage). To my joy, I was informed that the very talented PechaKucha team had selected me.

Next came the daunting task of preparing the slides – setting my story right, hunting for the appropriate pictures for the slides. That actually was not as difficult as I thought it would be. Though it called for some iterations, lots of “gentle” reminders and patience from PechaKucha team members especially Zhen (thank you for bearing with all the stupid questions which came your way). However, the issues were faced when I thought of practising. Just two days left for the event, I was making a mess. I remember the first time I practised – the entire 20 slides (each with 20 seconds) were over and I had not finished half of my story! I was always gifted with this art of talking a lot and not being precise. That would definitely be put to the test now. So then came the phase of cutting it short and making it just fit within 20 seconds. The next time I practised, I finished the story when I was in slide 10! The pressure of finishing the story was high so I missed mentioning half of the points which I had to. With some iterations I was ultimately there.
On the D-day, when we reached Sint Janskerk - it was a packed house. The stage was set and rows of chairs were placed perfectly surrounding the stage. There were at least 300 people. I was trying to find familiar faces (as that would boost my confidence– human psychology as talking to known people is less of a stress than addressing unknown people) but there were hardly any. Then came the reassuring words from my husband – “You have spoken at a gathering of 100 people before. Speaking to 100 people and 300 people will feel the same”. Feeling a bit relaxed by his remark, I went and chose a comfortable spot.

What I loved the most was the concept of starting with the programme at 20:20. All the speakers were outstanding, the topics and their stories were thought-provoking. There were a lot of ideas and energies which were brought in. The audience (I being a part of it too) was completely enlightened and very enthusiastic. The more I watched the speakers, the more tensed I became. It was already intimidating to match the standards set by the speakers. But I was banking on the audience, if I falter or forget something they will clap and cheer me for that too :)
Then came my turn. Rodrigo announced my name and yes, I was on stage. What was playing in my mind in the first two seconds – “Wow, that’s a lot of people looking at me, how do I engage with them? Oops, watch your posture, where are your hands, oh no, I have a microphone, what were the first lines?  Ah forget it, just be yourself”.  (Yeah, mind is faster than light, all this I thought in two seconds)

And that’s what happened for the next 6 minutes 40 seconds – I was myself. I spoke about how we had come up with HomeHandi, an online platform which connects passionate cooks to food lovers like us and provides healthy home cooked food options. The most interesting part of the talk was when I started speaking about our learnings. I could feel an immediate connection with the audience. The one on how we could empower most of the cooks who were women homemakers by boosting their self-confidence and making them financially independent was appreciated by everyone. By the time I spoke about how we realised that people from various cultures unite or bond together over food, I was completely at ease. “Food is a universal language and we see it as an enabler to connect people from various countries i.e. expats, students and locals together. That is exactly what we saw happening in our flagship event – International Food Festival held in Maastricht. Why not make Maastricht city as one of the pioneers in forming a culturally inclusive community?” While saying all this,  it really did not hit me that I was at this grand location or event. I felt as if it was a normal chit-chat which I was having with a group of friends of mine (PechaKucha actually signifies chit-chat).  I spoke without any inhibitions and my passion controlled my speech. I enjoyed thoroughly those 6 minutes and 40 seconds which came my way.
At the end of the event I was approached by many familiar faces – familiar as I had seen them from the podium so now they were no more unfamiliar to me. I felt that PechaKucha gave me that platform to bring out the confidence in me, helped me to approach and interact with so many people, gave me the opportunity to enlighten myself. The informal way of story-telling with pictures is something very unique and very heart warming. Thank you PechaKucha for my 6 minutes and 40 seconds :)
 
By Sonia Kar, HomeHandi

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About the City's Organizers

  • Jean-Paul Toonen

    Curious | Share | Culture | Education | Ideas | Youth | Giving | Undercurrent | Hiking | Writing | World Music | Film

  • Sueli Brodin

    Born in Brazil from a Japanese/Brazilian mother and a French father, I grew up in Pakistan, Japan and France. After completing a bachelor's degree in English literature, I won a one-year scholarship to study at Rutgers University, New Jersey. I met my Dutch husband in Israel and we have been living in Maastricht, the Netherlands, since April 1994. We have three children, a cat, three tortoises, six chickens and two aquariums full of fish. I work as an Editor/ Communications Officer at United Nations University-MERIT / Maastricht University and a freelance editor at Maastricht School of Management. I joined the team of PechaKucha Maastricht in December 2009 and greatly enjoy being part of the global PechaKucha community. Watch my video portrait at: http://bit.ly/6CnU8w

  • Nadine Boesten

    Nadine Boesten (21) is a European Studies bachelor student at Maastricht University. In 2011 she started to suffer from epileptic seizures caused by stress. Nadine is determined to spread more knowledge about these kind of seizures throughout the world and will do an internship with the Epilepsy Free Foundation in New York City this summer. She will organise and speak at the second conference organised for people with this condition. She is planning to do a master in European Public Health after her bachelor in the hope to tackle problems she encountered with the current health system on a European policy level.