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"We do this by putting on an unique show every week. Each week is an different experiment with a different structure, different form, different set of rules."

In QED Comedy Laboratory from PechaKucha Night Knoxville Vol.17Matt Chadourne introduces an interesting comedy club. QED Comedy Laboratory is his experimental comedy show in Knoxville, TN, created in 2014, featuring a different theme every week, combining stand-up, improv, sketch, music, etc. 



"How do I keep the creative fires burning as a grown-ass man, with taxes due and a bum knee."

In "It’s All a Blank Canvas" from PechaKucha Night Knoxville Vol. 18Chris McAdoo shares his creative journey to today, both personally and professionally…and what keeps the creative fires burning as age, responsibilities, and (at least to an extent) maturity, sneak up on a "grown-ass man." 



"I was really interested in the challenge of replicating these textrues, patterns, and forms of meteorites."

For Matthew Cummings, artwork has always been personal journey for escape and meditation in both the making process and viewing.  "The Moon is my Scholar Rock" from PechaKucha Night Knoxville Vol. 18 is a look at the work from his last solo exhibition, 'The Moon is my Gongshi'.  This group of work examined the moon as an object of meditation, the tradition of Chinese Scholar Rocks or Gongshi, and the inspiring career of his grandfather-in-law, Charles Bradshaw, who ran the computations department for NASA during the development of Rocket Technology. 


“The idea is that if we just use progressive design techniques and agile thinking that maybe we can reformat the city itself into new ideas of space.”

In Knox : 682 from PechaKucha Night Knoxville’s 17th volumeKeith Kaseman, founding partner of the architecture and design firm KBAS, shares his first 682 days as a professor at the University of Tennessee School of Architecture and Design and as a resident of Knoxville, TN.


“When I tell people what I do, they often say ‘oh, you must not be able to tell us anything about it, it must be top secret’. That is totally not true.”

In The Not-So-Secrets of Oak Ridge from PechaKucha Night Knoxville’s 17th volume, Alice Taylor provides some insight into what physicists are up to at the Lab. Most people in Knoxville know that some sort of science is happening in Oak Ridge, but they often don’t know what it's about and how it might one day impact their lives. She explains how the huge new facility - the Spallation Neutron Source -  helps explain weird materials like ferromagnets and superconductors. We enter the world of quantum mechanics to explain how we investigate the tiny, microscopic electrons which ultimately make a magnet stick to your fridge.


"Our goal is to teach people how to run the presses and then allow you guys to come in here and use them for your own purposes."

In How To Make Printmaking Accessible To All from Knoxville, Vol. 14Bryan Baker shares his collaborative printmaking project and garage-turned-studio-workspace-gallery-space, Striped Light. Team headquarters for a trio of creative minds, they will be publishing, collaborating, and exploring tangents of their own volition as works are developed for the Striped Light catalog and portfolio, at the same time opening their printshop to the public for learning workshops. The team of experienced printers will also be available for hire, offering limited-edition custom letterpress design and printing for events, business ephemera, and artistic ventures.


"I think there is probably a better way to better use this monetary and land resource that the U.S. is gifted with."

In Skyscrapers to Corn Fields, A Quest for KiloWatts from Knoxville Vol. 15, Hoi Chun Ho, shares the story of moving from his native Hong Kong megapolis city to rural Fort Scott, Kansas, a town with a population of 8000, when he was 16, adding that to call his experience cultural shock would have been an understatement  Goodbye skyscrapers, busy sidewalks fulll of pedestrians, and the fast pace of the city. Hello open plains, wide roads, big skies, and corn fields. Aside from feeling lonely and bored, he also felt immensely excited. In the open fields in America, he saw opportunities to learn about a rural way and a chance for a Hong Kong city boy to boost America’s clean, reliable, domestic, base-load, renewable energy production.

“I’m interested in the new spaces we’re forced to inhabit after disasters.”

Artist Victoria Buck is interested in the conflicting concepts of protection, vulnerability, and hope in the time during and following abrupt natural disasters.

In “Memory of Place” from PKN Knoxville Vol. 14, she discusses her work, and how it’s intended to investigate the naive trust we place upon the shelter systems we have in place, and their supposed ability to protect us.

“I loved the Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn and I wanted to take a river trip like theirs.”

Ad and film professional Alex Oliver set out on a 1,000 mile journey down the Mississippi River on a mission. In “Voyage: East Tennessee to the Gulf of Mexico” from PKN Knoxville Vol. 14, we see how the goal of this trip was not only to conquer the Mississippi, but also one of self-discovery, and of the talented people around him.

“We’re a bunch of weird brothers making a film about male lactation.”

Filmmaker Noble Robinette speaks on his unique project entitled “MALK.” In “Malk” from PKN Knoxville Vol. 13 Noble describes what started as a mockumentary on male lactation and the efforts of a group of men to get closer to their families.

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