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Next Event

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07 MAY

NEXT EVENT VOL 15

Doors at 6:30

Presentations at 7:20

VIEW EVENT
 

Featured Presentation

Nichole McMinn shares her story, learning to face her fears and push herself in what she loves. A discussion of the struggles of the creative mind, the challenges faced as a young artist, and the realizations reached during this pursuit. 

"Presentation of the Day" on October 29, 2014.

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Starting a Newsweekly. In the 21st Century. Seriously.

BY TRICIA BATEMAN
@ VOL 14 ON FEB 12, 2015

In the days before Knoxville's urban revitalization, the Metro Pulse weekly paper became a catalyst for conversations which had a positive effect on the city's future. Now Knoxville is primed for the next wave of success beyond downtown and yet there is silence when those conversations are needed most. The core staff of the former Metro Pulse is launching a new paper. As the largest independent, locally-focused paper with the most experienced staff in town, the Knoxville Mercury will facilitate new conversations about our future, provide the city with investigative journalism, give voice to underserved communities and illuminate the region's history and unique culture. This presentation will provide insights on the development of paper and share some sneak peaks of the design that will be nearing completion in mid-February.

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Five Orders

BY TATIANA POTTS
@ VOL 14 ON FEB 12, 2015

I will present a manuscript that represents experiences of my family and I with focus on columns. Columns are supporting element in architecture and also represent a metaphor for me: a support of the family. As a parent I see myself as a pillar of the family, a support to my daughter with whom I can share my experience.
Through my dreamy settings, I want to preserve this experience and be that support and teach her to look and appreciate her environment. I grew up in Slovakia with being surrounded by architecture from the fifteenth century to modern. When I arrived to the U.S., I was surprised and realized how quickly my immediate environment changed when buildings were demolished and replaced. I felt a sense of lost due to this change. In my work, I feel a need to maintain, document, or revive the familiarity of the experienced space.

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How To Make Printmaking Accessible To All

BY BRYAN BAKER
@ VOL 14 ON FEB 12, 2015

Striped Light is a creative output imprint producing fine art, recorded material, and cultural experiences. This new establishment is the studio, office, and team headquarters for a trio of creative minds that have joined forces. They will be publishing, collaborating, and exploring tangents of their own volition as works are developed for the Striped Light catalog and portfolio. This team of experienced printers will also be available for hire, offering limited-edition custom letterpress design and printing for events, business ephemera, and artistic ventures.

Hands On Press, at Striped Light, is a space where creative collaborations can take place and unique editions get released. A letterpress print shop where projects can be realized by the public at large. It’s a learning center where classes lead to press rental. Retail and gallery space will show off what we do best and creative collaborative events will get scheduled regularly. What we need now is you.

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Voyage: East Tennessee to the Gulf of Mexico

BY ALEX OLIVER
@ VOL 14 ON FEB 12, 2015

Launching from the banks of the Tennessee River in downtown Knoxville, follow the adventure of a group of friends as they embark on a 1,000 mile journey to the Gulf of Mexico. Comprised of filmmakers, athletes, and musicians, the crew of 16 set out to gain a new perspective from the ageless wisdom of the river. The film briefly examines the consequences of a society fallen victim to routine, while encouraging the viewer to embrace the rich abundance of life waiting for those who follow their passions.

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Nourish Knoxville

BY CHARLOTTE TOLLEY
@ VOL 14 ON FEB 12, 2015

Charlotte Tolley has served as the director of the Market Square Farmers’ since its inception in 2004.  She describes the history and growth of the MSFM and how it has built community in Knoxville, and how it informed the start of its new umbrella organization, Nourish Knoxville.  As a 501c3 organization, Nourish Knoxville is cultivating relationships between farmers, artisanal producers, and the community through connections local food. 

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Tilling Fallow Land: How school gardens can be integral to the next generation of public schools.

BY ELIAS ATTEA
@ VOL 14 ON FEB 12, 2015

For a child, a garden is more than a greenspace.  It can be a place for peace, learning, and ownership. School gardens have been a revisited movement that have caught much momentum in the United States, and Pond Gap Elementary is a local advocate.  Horticultural pedagogy is more than just seeing plants grow.  School gardens can be an alternative to a more natural and tangible outlet for school curriculum, therapy, and physical and emotional development.   

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Addressing our future mobility needs now

BY ALEX PAWLOWSKI
@ VOL 14 ON FEB 12, 2015

Like any city, mobility is key to Knoxville’s future development and its larger success as a strong and diverse community. While increased access to greenways, the Urban Wilderness, and a movement back to downtown have provided alternative options to its automotive centered culture, the automobile looks to serve Knoxville for years to come. But what will that look like? And what are the challenges that exist between serving the needs of Knoxville residents and the environment in which Knoxville works and enjoys?

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Memory of Place

BY VICTORIA BUCK
@ VOL 14 ON FEB 12, 2015

My current work investigates the naive trust we place upon our shelter system’s ability to protect us. My interest lies within the conflicting ideas of protection, vulnerability and hope, during and after abrupt natural destruction. As pioneers and immigrants in new places and spaces, we believe and invest in the security of the systems we create. This belief in the security of stability is called into question during great disasters. Such was mine in the aftermath of the biggest natural disaster, my country has seen in decades, where a 6.3 magnitude earthquake awoke the land, in my home town of Otautahi / Christchurch, New Zealand in February, 2011.
I am intrigued by the irrevocable shift in one’s sense of self in relation to place that occurs after the illusion of stability ceases to exist. In these moments, the architectural landscape can become both threatened and threatening. I am mentally cataloging the beauty of our pioneering and afraid of the consequences in entrusting so much with our current systems of belief.

 

KNOXVILLE Blog

Memory of Place

“I’m interested in the new spaces we’re forced to inhabit after disasters.”
Artist Victoria Buck is interested in the conflicting concepts of protection, vulnerability, and hope in the time during and following abrupt natural disasters.
In “Memory of Place” from PKN Knoxville Vol. 14, she discusses her work, and how it’s intended to investigate the naive trust we place upon the shelter systems we have in place, and their supposed ability to protect us.

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About the City's Organizers

  • Dianna Osickey

    Dianna graduated from the University of Tennessee School of Architecture. She is a licensed architect with a specialty in lighting design. Her desire to combine the design process with a high level of craftsmanship have merged to create Fourth Year Studio - a custom design and letterpress company in Knoxville, TN. You can find her combing through antique stores for wooden type or inking up the press in her spare time.

  • Lorie Matthews

    A lover of all things creative, especially her designer husband, Lorie is currently pursing a Master's Degree in Conflict Management. She enjoys finding creative ways to bring people together to create collaborative outcomes. Lorie is happy to be part of the team that connects creatives in Knoxville through PechaKucha Night!

  • Ashley Pace

    Ashley is a Registered Architect in the State of Tennessee. She currently works at Sanders Pace Architecture as an architect and in business development. Ashley received her Master of Industrial Design graduate degree from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn and her undergraduate degree from The University of Tennessee where she was valedictorian of her School of Architecture class. With degrees in both architecture and industrial design, Ashley's work covers a broad range of design including furniture, product, interiors, and architecture. Ashley teaches at The University of Tennessee as an Adjunct Studio Professor. She spends most of her free-time wrangling her three beautiful and crazy kids.

Friends of PechaKucha

Friends of PechaKucha