HONOLULU Posts


“The goal is to try and make commentary on sociopolitical issues– things I see happening in the news.”

In Island Time Machine from PechaKucha Night Honolulu’s 24th Volume, Presenter Culture Shocka gives an eye-catching display of his portfolio. It doesn’t take long to spot the cultural influences in his vibrant work. In an attempt to reduce what could be lost in translation from his mind to yours, he uses a Modern and Minimalist-inspired approach, mixing equal parts Cartooning and Graphic Design.




This week's City Focus takes a bite out of "The Big Pineapple", Honolulu, Hawaii, whose PechaKucha Series, held at Honolulu Museum of Art, is constantly making waves. Take a vacation from what you're doing and dive into some of their truly enchanting presentations! Mahalo!


"[Aspects of the painting] were modified by the artist to fit a romantic and idealized version of a much contested historical event."

In When Caricature is Considered Portraiture from Honolulu Vol. 23, Assistant Curator of the Arts of Hawai‘i at the Honolulu Museum of Art, Healoha Johnson considers how caricatures often depict political events and high-profile figures, and then remain as visual historical records with the potential to circulate misconceptions as truth through what is, in fact, a badly distorted caricature of the actual event or figure.

Here she dissects "Hawaii's Decisive Hour", a painting by Eugene Savage, which could be said skews history by celebrating an annexation treaty between the U.S. and Hawaii that never actually passed. 



"Its an ancient god, being awakened, being uploaded, being digitized...along with all the other worldly mythologies." 

In Mata is Meta-Data: Mapping the Anthropolithic Age from Honolulu Vol. 23 artist Solomon Enos, known for his "Epic Tales of Hi`iakaikapoliopele" interpreted as large scale murals and installations, passionately shares his most recent project, “Polyfantastica”, where evil corporations are personified as grotesque monsters in tales of battles of good over evil.

The work is a continuation of his life-long project called “Mata” in which he hopes may unify all the global mythologies and theologies into the final human narrative, hosted as an international public game for children.

This is some next level imagination! 

“Methanogens once ruled the earth — until the great oxygen catastrophe.”

Former science teacher and practicing artist Justin Davies delves into the mythical “will-o’-the-wisp” atmospheric ghost lights seen at night over bogs and swamps. In “Fire from the Breathless Muck” from PKN Honolulu Vol. 22, Justin gives us a scientific history of methane, oxygen, and carbons.

“Hawaiian eruptions sometimes produce these spectacular fountains…”

Specialist in Geology and Geophysics Scott Rowland has a hot, incandescent love for lava. In “Lava Flows” from PKN Honolulu Vol. 22 he speaks about his research he’s done on both fresh flows and and older volcanos, and how lava has affected the residents of the Hawaiian islands.

“At the end of their lives, these stars celebrated their achievements by hurling life-giving elements into space, in a gently expanding display of intense, nebula beauty.”

Retired Professor of Astronomy from the University of Hawaii Gareth Wynn-Williams speaks about the stars and the universe. In “Fire & Sky & Life” from PKN Honolulu Vol. 22, Gareth shows us what 34 years of fantastic astronomy lectures results in.

Alison Beste uses light to examine the relationship between artificial and natural constructs.

Artist and photographer Alison Beste’s work explores the boundaries between the built and natural world through the use of light effects on the ocean horizon. In “Shedding Light on Paradise” from PKN Honolulu Vol. 20, Alison speaks about light from cities, vessels, and beacons as powerful metaphors for the ways we interact, manage, and attempt to control our environment.

Once upon a new moon, the sun finds itself slowly getting obstructed.

Physicist at the University of Hawaii Shadia Habbal’s love for the Sun has taken her across the globe, always trying to unveil its our star’s secrets. In “Unveiling the Beauty of the Sun” from PKN Honolulu Vol. 21 she speaks of eclipses, corona, sunspots, plasmoids, and solar wind.

How can Hawaii become the model agricultural society for the world?

Josh Lanthier-Welch gives a great crash-course on the agricultural history of the Hawaiian islands. The islands went from feeding being self-sufficient to entirely reliant on imports.

In "Beyond Eating Local: Using History as a Guide to a New Food Security" from PKN Honolulu Vol. 18, Josh shows us how the Hawaiians can once again utilise their lush volcanic farmland to return themselves to a sustainable, self-sufficient agricultural society.

VIEW MORE

Friends of PechaKucha