HONOLULU Posts

“He mimes geological compression, squeezing all of the detritus together to make a post-consumerist stone.”

In Artistic Encounters with Plastiglomerate, Derelict Fishing Gear, and other Pacific Plastic Flotsam from PechaKucha Night Honolulu Vol. 27, Jan Dickey, UHM MFA candidate, and Jaimey Hamilton Faris, UHM Associate Professor of Contemporary Art and Critical Theory, will talk about how art engages with the environmental impact of plastic trash in the Pacific Ocean. They will introduce the work of three artists: Kelly Jazvac’s “readymade” plastiglomerate (a newly designated geologic formation of sand, coral, and plastic); Maika’i Tubbs’ attempts to replicate platiglomerate’s geology; and Mary Babcock’s weavings of plastic fishing line found on the shores of the Hawaiian Islands.

“I compose each piece of marine debris into an interesting and ambiguous object.”

In Nurdle in the Rough from PechaKucha Night Honolulu Vol. 27, Kathleen Crabill shares how she started transforming ocean plastic into conversation starting gems. Crabill is an ocean lover who grew up on the Big Island. She went on to receive a BFA from Virginia Commonwealth University with a concentration in metalsmithing. Bringing her skills and desire for healthy oceans back to Hawaii, she started a business called Nurdle in the Rough Jewelry.

Plastic Printing

“How can I get [students] away from the computer, pull them out of the screen, and how can I get them to think with their hands and to approach things outside of a pixel?”

In Plastic Printing from PechaKucha Night Honolulu Vol. 27Rob McConnell shares the technique of printing typography and designs using LEGO pieces. As a Graphic Design Professor at Brigham Young University Hawaii, he is interested in exploring all the possible learning experiences that this technique allows. This presentation covers how he came upon the idea and some of the plastic printing work that we have produced in the past year.

"The system is based on modular wood blocks, and it's intended for anyone to be able to access it. So people of all ages and all backgrounds can be quickly instructed in how to make a print like this."

In .5 ppi Project from PechaKucha Night Honolulu - Vol. 26Duncan Dempster introduced .5 ppi Project. .5ppi is an ongoing endeavor that generates collaboratively produced prints and installations revolving around the performative, reproductive, and repetitive aspects of printing and print culture. .5ppi means one half pixel per inch, which refers to the image resolution of the first .5ppi project. Duncan Dempster is a Honolulu-based artist and educator and is the executive director of Honolulu Printmakers.

Island Time Machine


“The goal is to try and make commentary on sociopolitical issues– things I see happening in the news.”

In Island Time Machine from PechaKucha Night Honolulu’s 24th Volume, Presenter Culture Shocka gives an eye-catching display of his portfolio. It doesn’t take long to spot the cultural influences in his vibrant work. In an attempt to reduce what could be lost in translation from his mind to yours, he uses a Modern and Minimalist-inspired approach, mixing equal parts Cartooning and Graphic Design.




This week's City Focus takes a bite out of "The Big Pineapple", Honolulu, Hawaii, whose PechaKucha Series, held at Honolulu Museum of Art, is constantly making waves. Take a vacation from what you're doing and dive into some of their truly enchanting presentations! Mahalo!


"[Aspects of the painting] were modified by the artist to fit a romantic and idealized version of a much contested historical event."

In When Caricature is Considered Portraiture from Honolulu Vol. 23, Assistant Curator of the Arts of Hawai‘i at the Honolulu Museum of Art, Healoha Johnson considers how caricatures often depict political events and high-profile figures, and then remain as visual historical records with the potential to circulate misconceptions as truth through what is, in fact, a badly distorted caricature of the actual event or figure.

Here she dissects "Hawaii's Decisive Hour", a painting by Eugene Savage, which could be said skews history by celebrating an annexation treaty between the U.S. and Hawaii that never actually passed. 



"Its an ancient god, being awakened, being uploaded, being digitized...along with all the other worldly mythologies." 

In Mata is Meta-Data: Mapping the Anthropolithic Age from Honolulu Vol. 23 artist Solomon Enos, known for his "Epic Tales of Hi`iakaikapoliopele" interpreted as large scale murals and installations, passionately shares his most recent project, “Polyfantastica”, where evil corporations are personified as grotesque monsters in tales of battles of good over evil.

The work is a continuation of his life-long project called “Mata” in which he hopes may unify all the global mythologies and theologies into the final human narrative, hosted as an international public game for children.

This is some next level imagination! 

“Methanogens once ruled the earth — until the great oxygen catastrophe.”

Former science teacher and practicing artist Justin Davies delves into the mythical “will-o’-the-wisp” atmospheric ghost lights seen at night over bogs and swamps. In “Fire from the Breathless Muck” from PKN Honolulu Vol. 22, Justin gives us a scientific history of methane, oxygen, and carbons.

“Hawaiian eruptions sometimes produce these spectacular fountains…”

Specialist in Geology and Geophysics Scott Rowland has a hot, incandescent love for lava. In “Lava Flows” from PKN Honolulu Vol. 22 he speaks about his research he’s done on both fresh flows and and older volcanos, and how lava has affected the residents of the Hawaiian islands.

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