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Next Event

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24 OCT

NEXT EVENT VOL 29

We're calling on locals to get up on stage and inspire their peers at the next Pecha Kucha Night 29 on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at the brand-new Proscenium Theatre in Allard Hall, MacEwan University!

All applications are welcome—all you need is an idea or story that you’re passionate about sharing, as well as 20 images so accompany it. Be sure to check out the presentation guidelines at edmontonnexten.ca/pkn and get inspired by previous presentations of Edmontonians below!

Submit your presentation idea for PKN 29 by Sunday, September 17, 2017.

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Featured Presentation

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Chris Chang- Yen Phillips

Communications Officer, Alberta Council for Global Cooperation in Edmonton

The Land We Stand On

PRESENTED ON JUN 01, 2017
IN EDMONTON @ VOL 28

"I want to persuade you today that there are in fact thousands of years of stories here, and I want to give you some tools to recognize them."

Storyteller, community historian, and Edmonton's Historian Laureate Chris Chang-Yen Phillips talks about what happens what he fields questions about history from Edmontonians, and what he's learned from working with locals to seek the answers.

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Inviting the Indigenous Sports World to Edmonton

BY JODI STONEHOUSE
@ VOL 28 ON JUN 01, 2017

"We have to get back to that circle where we're sitting together because that was the intention—that we're all Treaty people. We have a responsibility and an obligation to the lands, the waters, to each other and to our children."

In "Inviting the Indigenous Sports World to Edmonton" from PechaKucha Night Edmonton Vol. 28, Jodi Stonehouse sheds light on the beauty of the World Indigenous Nations Games soon to visit Edmonton—what they mean for the city, for Indigenous peoples, and for every one of us looking to grow and reconcile together.

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Transforming to a Resilient City

BY DANIELLE KOLEYAK
@ VOL 28 ON JUN 01, 2017

"Imagine if we worked even harder to protect our ecosystems so that they continue to provide us with goods and services ... so that we don't have to spend so much of our money on engineering solutions."

Danielle Koleyak considers the impacts our changing climate could have on the biophysical environment and therefore the liveability of our cities. More importantly, she poses some ideas for building resilience and mitigating some of these impacts.

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Re-Positioning Mental Health

BY MARK KORTHUIS
@ VOL 28 ON JUN 01, 2017

“It might surprise you that Abraham Lincoln, when he was the President of the United States, suffered from clinical depression. He suffered for the duration of his life, and at the time they considered that a character flaw.”

Mark Korthuis examines the history of mental health—where we've been, where we are now, and why the mental health landscape will look drastically different over the next 150 years.

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Creating a Dialogue and Building a Story

BY RAJ BALI
@ VOL 28 ON JUN 01, 2017

"It's a placement of onesself outside the norm and the mainstream. It's an identity that's perfect for society critique. 'Queer' is not a bad word. It's an owned word—a negative word that's been given a positive connotation by our community."

Raj Bali has spent the last year working to build a space for marginalized people to share their experience, create a dialogue and learn from one another. His experience informed this talk on queer representation and why it's essential to give more of the spotlight to marginalized voices.

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Where the Spirits Roam

BY CONOR KERR
@ VOL 28 ON JUN 01, 2017

"The land means everything to me. I'm just another part of the circle. When I work with youth who are lost in a myriad of government-imposed systems, this connection has often been broken. And how do we bring that connection back?"

Conor Kerr shares how creating a cultural connection to the natural evironment for both Indigenous and non-Indigenous youth will allow for finding who we are as Indigenous people and as allies moving forward together.

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Black Edmoton: Our History, Our Legacy

BY BASHIR MOHAMED
@ VOL 28 ON JUN 01, 2017

"This history is not meant to shame. It's based on the principle that the first step to step a problem is to recognize that there is one."

Bashir Mohamed shares personal and historic anecdotes of racism and resistance against Black Edmontonians. Through his story and others, Bashir explains the importance of learning and celebrating this history in order to understand contemporary racism and why groups such as Black Lives Matter are relevant now more than ever.

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The River

BY JACQUELYN CARDINAL
@ VOL 28 ON JUN 01, 2017

“Like many Indigenous youth these days, I grew up in the city. And I wonder every day, how can I better be an Indigenous person when everything has been paved over?”

Jacquelyn Cardinal, tech entrepreneur and nêhiyaw-iskwêw from northern Alberta, explores the journey that Indigenous and non-Indigenous Canadians must take together to fully realize the promise of Canada through understanding and putting into practice the Peace and Friendship Treaties.

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Educate, Integrate, Celebrate

BY KAREN UNGER
@ VOL 28 ON JUN 01, 2017

"In a world that likes to divide between us and them, it's not about creating a space for them and creating a space for us. It's about recognizing our common humanity."

Karen Unger introduces us to motionball, an organization that seeks to introduce young professionals to the Special Olympics movement and break down barriers between 'neuro-typical' adults and adults with an intellectual disability.

 

EDMONTON Blog

 

About the City's Organizers

  • Christine Causing

    Christine is the Coordinator for the NextGen Initiative.

  • Ryan Stephens

    Born and raised in Edmonton, Ryan spends his time absorbed in the stories and motions of the city as NextGen’s Pecha Kucha Nights Co-Chair, a freelance writer, and as Communications Coordinator for the Edmonton Heritage Council. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in English and Sociology from the University of Alberta, where he grew fond of writing about Edmonton’s past and future for the University’s newspaper The Gateway. Ryan continues to write for local publications and spends his spare time fuelling his obsessions with writing, film and local heritage—all that accompanied by a hip-hop soundtrack.