This week the Pechakucha People Spotlight shines on Netta Egoz of Christchurch New Zealand, whose role as PechaKucha City ORganzier plays a key part in her community's "city-making movement''. In addition to PKN organizer and presenter extraordinaire she's also a community Lawyer AND spends her spare hours on the radio via RDU 98.5fm (Chch). 

"Fighting the fashion industry is not going to change the problems, but supporting environmental friendly and ethical products can."

In "The Cost of Cotton" from Christchurch Vol. 24, student Samantha Jones shares how she launched an eco fashion brand in her spare time. The environmental cost,  social cost, child labor, increased awarness and concerns in clothing production are the subject of her passionate talk. Let's support environmentally friendly and ethical products!

"After 100 years they are still standing,...the original buildings on the Antarctic Continent."

In Icy Heritage from Christchurch Vol. 23, Programme Manager-Conservator Lizzie Meek presents the Antarctic Heritage Trust which cares for a collection of simple, wooden expedition bases, filled with everyday objects. A life-changing experience for many of the people who visit them in Antarctica, they also strongly resonate with people who will never visit – because they are, despite the odds, still standing. Six minutes on the power of place, and the value of heritage in its original context.

Bundle up!

“What if [climate change] is all a big hoax and we create a better world for nothing?” -Joel Pett

Exhibition developer and sustainability professional Bec McMaster is fascinated by all things Antarctica. In “Antarctic Time Travel” from PKN Christchurch Vol. 20 Bec shares the process of engaging with some of New Zealand’s leading scientists in order to present past and future climate change in a balanced and empowering manner.

“Open up the doors, cook, let strangers come — this is the only way we can ward off ruin.”

Justin Strother tells a story of moving to the bottom of the world. In “The Supper Club Project” from PKN Christchurch Vol.22 she speaks about her journey to find a place to live in the little town of Lyttleton, and her food and warmth-filled path to finding a cure to loneliness.

“I love brains — not in a zombie sort of way — I love discovering how they work.”

Occupational therapist Julie Frew explores a thought: science can be interpreted as very bleak, but also full of hope. In “Universal Grey Matter” from PKN Christchurch Vol. 21 she draws parallels between the human brain and our vast universe.

“‘Just imagine,’ ‘I wonder,’ and ‘What if’ are some of my favorite words in the English language. They conjure up the possible, the impossible, and the just plain crazy.”

Abigail Walsh tells us a story of sheep, and his best friend bird. In “The Story of Sheep” from PKN Christchurch Vol. 21 we also hear about elephant, a retired mountain guide who sheep desires to meet. Abigail tells us how her story came to life, and how it was interwoven with her own.

"When I see that little locomotive, I smell the engine oil, it takes me back — I’m a kid again."

TV screenwriter Andrew Gunn reveals to us his dirty little secret -- his love for model trains!

In “Loco-motives” from PKN Christchurch Vol. 20, Gunn expresses his love for model trains, and how they allow him to escape into a fantasy world. He compares his job as a script writer for children's films to these miniature train worlds and says that he enjoys the feeling of safety and wonder these worlds provide. 

“At the moment our culture doesn’t really allow us to talk about sex.”

Katie Cowan wants us to talk more about sex. And in “I Want to Talk about Sex” from PKN Christchurch Vol. 20, she goes into depth on reasons how sex can be a great thing, and how open and frank discussions about sex can only help bridge the void between men, women, and their partners.

“The church was empty, no one was sitting there, not even me. Nothing. It was the most beautiful thing I had ever felt.”

Cartoonist and illustrator Dylan Horrocks begins with his childhood desire to believe in fantastical beings. In “The Empty Church: My Year of Belief” from PKN Christchurch Vol. 20, he shows us how after years of Atheism, he decided to give belief a chance, and he surveyed people in an attempt to see things through their eyes. He soon found the border between religion and unbelief was much more complicated that he had thought.


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