PechaKucha Presentation

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Elizabeth Blasius

Architectural Historian in Chicago

Historic Preservation is Dead!

PRESENTED ON JUN 07, 2016
IN CHICAGO @ VOL 38

Elizabeth Blasius instructs us to pour a drink and mourn the passing of historic preservation for buildings.

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Revive Alameda

BY KILLIS ALMOND
@ VOL 10 ON MAY 28, 2013

Killis Almond goes in depth on the history of San Antonio's Alameda Theater and the city's current plans for its use and preservation. 

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Designing for Historic Context

BY DAVID MAYO
@ VOL 14 ON OCT 16, 2014

David Mayo, architect at De Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop, discusses the need to respect the characteristics of historic neighborhoods when designing projects and continue the story while being unapologetic to our place in history.

"Presentation of the Day" on February 18, 2015.

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The Belt Line: Hiding in Plain Sight

BY CHRIS HAWLEY
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"The Belt Line … will be the next phase in Buffalo’s sustainable development."

In The Belt Line: Hiding in Plain Sight from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 16, urbanist and preservationist, Chris Hawley, presents the Belt Line -- one of the most conspicuous and least-known features of Buffalo, NY. Each day, trains go by along it and people drive underneath and over it. It is the "third strand" in Buffalo's DNA, as important to the city's physical and economic geography as Joseph Ellicott's radial and grid plan and Frederick Law Olmsted's park and parkway system; as consequential to the city's development as the Erie Canal and Interstate Highway System.

The Belt Line was opened in 1883, with segments dating back to 1836. The rail line is 15 miles long, forming a continuous loop through Buffalo╩╝s downtown as well as the prominent industrial loft clusters that it helped to create. Today, the Belt Line's 12 million square feet of largely vacant or underutilized industrial space is the city's next frontier for sustainable development. Factory buildings are being recycled as mixed-use developments. These former industrial areas are becoming walkable centers again.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, July 27th, 2016. 

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Historic Preservationist

BY JASON HITCHCOCK
@ VOL 20 ON MAY 23, 2016

Jason Hitchcock gives us a look at design in adaptive reuse.

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Historic Downtown

BY JAMES HOOBLER
@ VOL 20 ON MAY 23, 2016

James Hoobler tells about how The District became what it is today.

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Creative Re-use of Historic and Industrial Buildings

BY SIMON DEVLIN
@ VOL 8 ON JAN 31, 2017

"There are some really unusual historic buildings out there that have been developed into quite interesting buildings."

Architect Simon Devlin talks about some of the more unusual historic buildings in the UK that have been converted and redeveloped for re-use in clever and profound ways that improve culture whilst retaining their iconic status and historical value.

This was "Presentation of the Day" on July 6th, 2017. 

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Achieving Sustainability by Adaptive Reuse

BY FREDERIC DALBIN
@ VOL 14 ON OCT 15, 2016

Projections show that 50% of architectural design in the next 20+ years and beyond will be for renovating and re-purposing existing buildings.  This represents an historic opportunity for the architecture and building community to reverse the most significant crisis of modern time:  energy depletion and environmental degradation.  Fred Dalbin demonstrate approaches and practices for conservation and adaptive re-use of the existing built environment through projects completed by this firm.

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Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78

BY FRANK PALEN, ESQ., AICP
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

“Think of me as a time traveler. I’m going to take you back to a place called Buffalo in the 1970s.”

In Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78 from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, attorney and urban renewal advocate, Frank Palen, recalls the creation of a historic district for theatre and culture from a once abandoned rust belt urban core. From 1977 to 1979, Palen was Research Associate in the Center for Community Research and Development at the University at Buffalo’s School of Architecture and Environmental Design, serving as Coordinator of the Buffalo Entertainment District Project. The University at Buffalo’s graduate studio investigated the potential of promoting a theater district in what was then an increasingly abandoned section of Downtown, despite various setbacks and a challenging political climate. The result was a very high-profile effort that set an agenda for the redevelopment of Buffalo that continues today.

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When Are They Going To Put A Roof On That Thing?

BY MARK HEINZ
IN KNOXVILLE

In 1933 Elizabeth (Betty) Wiley Dunlap and her family traveled from Knoxville, TN to visit the Chicago World’s Fair.  What they experienced there inspired one of the first Modern Residences in Knoxville. Mark Heinz delves into the history surrounding this historic house and shares some the steps he is taking to make the house a home for his family.