PechaKucha Presentation


Rachel Adams

Associate Curator, UB Art Galleries, University at Buffalo in Buffalo



Rachel Adams 
Associate Curator
UB Art Galleries, University at Buffalo

Rachel Adams discusses her forthcoming exhibition at the University at Buffalo Art Galleries, Wanderlust. This exhibition will be a survey of actions, showcasing the variety of artists exploring and creating work in an outdoor setting, which range in medium from drawing, photography, sculpture, installations, film, and video to performance and social practice taking place in both urban and rural landscapes.

For more information about the UB Art Galleries, visit


Litany: An Aggregation of Everything

@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

Paul Lloyd Sargent
Artist & PhD Candidate, 
Department of Media Study, University at Buffalo, Erie Basin Meets Erie Basin: Artificial Corridors

Tracing environmental disaster, uneven development, and the externalities of global capital from the eastern shores of Lake Erie to the banks of Newtown Creek via the NYS Canal System, Paul Lloyd Sargent practices an embodied media archaeology atop piles of the debris of history.


Sharing Landscapes

@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"We're increasingly looking at our landscapes in ways that, when we share them, we can also have an active dialogue about how they change."

In Sharing Landscapes from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, Curator of Public Art at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo, NY, Aaron Ott, talks about specific examples of public artworks that alter our perception and usage of shared environments. Ott reviews his experience working with the Collections at the Albright-Knox and discusses inspiring works that highlight his interest in creating environmental spaces that reframe our relationship with our shared landscapes.


Buffalo Vitascope: The Story of the World's First Movie Theater

@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"The world's first movie theater was in Buffalo, New York."

In Buffalo Vitascope: The Story of the World's First Movie Theater from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, comedian and cartoonist Pat Kewley tells the true story of Vitascope Hall, which opened on Buffalo, New York's Main Street in 1896 and was likely the world's first permanent, specially constructed movie theater. Using period photographs, newspaper clippings, and his own cartoon drawings, Kewley spreads the word about Buffalo's amazing & unique place in film history, touching on the early days of moviegoing, the first films, and the unsung Buffalonians who helped pioneer the film industry in our own backyard.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, Jun 29th, 2016. 


A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects

@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"A wall and a column...what they have in common is an interest in looking at the cultural agency of traditional building materials and their ability to speak."

In A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Peter Reyner Banham Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor Ang Li presents a pair of site specific installations that explore the cultural agency of vernacular building materials. Horror Vacui is an installation in Lisbon, Portugal that examines the ability of building facades to “speak” through the medium of the Portuguese “azulejo” - hand-painted ceramic tiles often depicting scenes from historic or civic events. The piece explores the narrative potential of bricks and mortar within contemporary image sharing and crowdsourcing platforms. No Frills is an installation in Buffalo, New York that stems out of an interest in the industrialized production of terracotta in the 19th century as a new kind of ornamental language. In a semi-abandoned Chevrolet Factory by the architect Albert Kahn, a 13-foot column interrupts the existing grid of the assembly floor,  acting as a bridge between the vast scale of obsolete industry and the human scale of the architectural ornament.


Foraging and Picking

@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"Architects are hunters and gatherers." 

In "Foraging and Picking" from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 17, professor of architecture Brian Carter provides a retrospective of twenty postcards from his many travels, highlighting what each image signifies in the mind of an architect. Carter reminds us that architecture can be an international language. It prompts travel, causing us walk into buildings, to meet people, and to listen, sense and smell the places that we go. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Monday, November 21st, 2016. 


A Brief Memoir of Architectural Space

@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"This is my 6-minute memoir. A mediation on impermanence."

In A Brief Memoir of Architecural Space from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, independent arts consultant and co-organizer of PechaKucha Buffalo, Joanna Gillespie, delivers a meditation on twenty of the fifty places she has lived since birth. From Victorian-era structures in Buffalo, NY and San Francisco, CA, to the wilds of the 1970's California coast, to modern and efficient rural Japan, to a Postmodern art utopia in Maine, and beyond, Gillespie recounts a particular memory from each space. Through all of the temporal landscapes we find ourselves in, Gillespie concludes, "We forge on, either clumsily or assuredly. We keep on keeping on." Even if we move fifty times.


The Story of Buffalo BookBike

@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

“We need to bring the fun back to reading, and rolling up with a book bike might be a way to do that.” 

In The Story of Buffalo BookBike from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Founder of Buffalo BookBike in Buffalo, NY, Amy Ozay, talks about her love of Buffalo, books, and bikes. Taking inspiration from similar programs in other cities, she launched Buffalo BookBike in 2015, which gives free books to the children of Buffalo in parks and playgrounds throughout the summer months. The BookBike has given away over 1,000 books to date, with the hopes of slowing down the summer slide. Her dream is to increase the reach of the BookBike, foster more collaboration between local literacy organizations, and help convert Buffalo parks to open air libraries in the future. As Cicero wrote, “A room without books is like a body without a soul.” 


Collage City

@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016.


Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78

@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

“Think of me as a time traveler. I’m going to take you back to a place called Buffalo in the 1970s.”

In Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78 from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, attorney and urban renewal advocate, Frank Palen, recalls the creation of a historic district for theatre and culture from a once abandoned rust belt urban core. From 1977 to 1979, Palen was Research Associate in the Center for Community Research and Development at the University at Buffalo’s School of Architecture and Environmental Design, serving as Coordinator of the Buffalo Entertainment District Project. The University at Buffalo’s graduate studio investigated the potential of promoting a theater district in what was then an increasingly abandoned section of Downtown, despite various setbacks and a challenging political climate. The result was a very high-profile effort that set an agenda for the redevelopment of Buffalo that continues today.