PechaKucha Presentation

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Bradshaw Hovey, Ph.D.

Research Associate Professor, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning in Buffalo

"They wanted to infuse architecture with research and they proposed to build a pedagogical process around project work."

In The Seneca-Salamanca Leasehold Study from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Research Associate Professor 
at the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, Bradshaw Hovey, Ph.D., recounts how one of the great student research projects from the school's 50-year history was devised by the school's founding leadership. One of the very first projects to engage UB students was a paid commission for the Seneca Nation of Indians to advise them on negotiations for a new lease between the nation and the residents of the City of Salamanca, NY whose homes sat on Seneca land. That such a project would be undertaken by architecture students was a signal about how expansively the founders of the school conceived of its professional domain.

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Litany: An Aggregation of Everything

BY PAUL LLOYD SARGENT
@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

Paul Lloyd Sargent
Artist & PhD Candidate, 
Department of Media Study, University at Buffalo, Erie Basin Meets Erie Basin: Artificial Corridors

Tracing environmental disaster, uneven development, and the externalities of global capital from the eastern shores of Lake Erie to the banks of Newtown Creek via the NYS Canal System, Paul Lloyd Sargent practices an embodied media archaeology atop piles of the debris of history.

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A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects

BY ANG LI
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"A wall and a column...what they have in common is an interest in looking at the cultural agency of traditional building materials and their ability to speak."

In A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Peter Reyner Banham Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor Ang Li presents a pair of site specific installations that explore the cultural agency of vernacular building materials. Horror Vacui is an installation in Lisbon, Portugal that examines the ability of building facades to “speak” through the medium of the Portuguese “azulejo” - hand-painted ceramic tiles often depicting scenes from historic or civic events. The piece explores the narrative potential of bricks and mortar within contemporary image sharing and crowdsourcing platforms. No Frills is an installation in Buffalo, New York that stems out of an interest in the industrialized production of terracotta in the 19th century as a new kind of ornamental language. In a semi-abandoned Chevrolet Factory by the architect Albert Kahn, a 13-foot column interrupts the existing grid of the assembly floor,  acting as a bridge between the vast scale of obsolete industry and the human scale of the architectural ornament.

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Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975

BY CHARLES L. DAVIS, II, PH.D.
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"We started with several books that looked at the brownstone as a site of intervention."

In Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975 from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Charles L. Davis, II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, shows works from his recent exhibition project, Building Black Utopias, and discusses the literature that served as inspiration. 

The Building Black Utopias project combines the tools of the architect, the historian and the literary critic to recover the historical contributions of African American writers to architectural utopian thought. It specifically examines the role of literary depictions of place in June Jordan, Amiri Baraka, Paule Marshall and Angela Davis’ writings. Davis argues that each authors’ rhetorical manipulations of the built environment operates on the same level as architectural utopian thought insofar as both mediums created rich, alternative depictions of modernist space to liberate the architect’s imagination. The final exhibit translates the spatial ideas of literature into drawings, models and other ephemera.

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Return of the Master Builder

BY MATTHEW HUME
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"I tell people I wear two hats—one of the designer and one of the builder, but as I evolve I wish to wear one hat, that of the Master Builder."

In the Return of the Master Builder from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17Adjunct Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning and Owner/Principle of HUME PROJECTS, LLC, Matthew Hume discusses his work creating residential and commercial projects, from the design phase through the construction phase. The traditional Master Builder once integrated both design and construction processes by direct involvement. The profession of architecture and processes of building are shifting back toward a more integrated approach forcing architects to re-evolve into earlier versions of themselves. Hume's recent work in design and construction projects serves as an example of this paradigm shift.

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Collage City

BY JEAN-MICHEL REED
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016.

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Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78

BY FRANK PALEN, ESQ., AICP
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

“Think of me as a time traveler. I’m going to take you back to a place called Buffalo in the 1970s.”

In Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78 from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, attorney and urban renewal advocate, Frank Palen, recalls the creation of a historic district for theatre and culture from a once abandoned rust belt urban core. From 1977 to 1979, Palen was Research Associate in the Center for Community Research and Development at the University at Buffalo’s School of Architecture and Environmental Design, serving as Coordinator of the Buffalo Entertainment District Project. The University at Buffalo’s graduate studio investigated the potential of promoting a theater district in what was then an increasingly abandoned section of Downtown, despite various setbacks and a challenging political climate. The result was a very high-profile effort that set an agenda for the redevelopment of Buffalo that continues today.

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Rethinking Resettlement

BY ERKIN ÖZAY
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"How can we make our endeavors clear and approachable enough that we can actually contribute to the public debate at a very high level?"

In Rethinking Resettlement from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University at Buffalo, Erkin Özay, reviews some of the social and design issues involved in rehousing and supporting Buffalo, New York's new Americans. Özay's Spring 2016 UB graduate studio explored the potential for temporary and long-term housing for newly arrived refugees and immigrants, as well as the role of supporting institutions, community assets, and reimagining the existing housing stock. Özay's project investigates "compassionate urbanism." He is interested in how groups of limited means--new and existing residents--support each other through careful intersections. 

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Universal Design

BY EDWARD STEINFELD, ARCH. D., AIA
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"It is a design process that enables and empowers a diverse population by improving human performance, health and wellness, and social participation."

In Universal Design from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Director of the IDeA Center in Buffalo, NY, Edward Steinfeld, ArchD, AIA, provides an overview of how the built environment affects access. The University at Buffalo's Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDeA Center) is dedicated to making environments and products more usable, safer and healthier in response to the needs of an increasingly diverse population. The IDeA Center’s activities are based on the philosophy of Inclusive Design, often called “Universal Design” or “Design for All.” It is a way of thinking that can be applied in any design activity, business practice, program or service involving interaction of people with the physical, social or virtual worlds.

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Buffalo Niagara by Design

BY ROBERT G. SHIBLEY
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"What was I thinking when I came to Buffalo? ... I was coming to join a social movement in our city and region, and I dove in head first."

In Buffalo Niagara Design from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Dean and Professor of the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, Robert Shibley, recounts his recruitment to Buffalo as Department Chair, 35 years ago. Upon the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the department, Shibley discusses his work with architecture and planning students, faculty and community members on various urban planning projects in the region. Across an arc of a quarter century, the UB Urban Design Project and the UB Regional Institute have been key players in the evolution of a broad regional planning framework.