PechaKucha Presentation

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Nicholas Rajkovich

Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning in Buffalo

"How do we start thinking about heat waves and why are heat waves so important?"

In How One Man on a 75-Pound Bicycle Took a City's Temperature from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Professor, Nicholas B. Rajkovich describes the design of a bicycle-based weather station used to find the “hot spots” of Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Every year in the United States, more people die from heat waves than any other type of natural disaster. Extreme heat events are expected to increase in the future due to climate change. Collecting a fine scale of microclimatic data can help to determine how physical characteristics contribute to human exposure to ground and air temperatures. These data also suggest how urban design strategies can reduce the impacts of the urban heat island effect. However, microclimate measurement poses substantial challenges. Rajkovich’s work investigates the intersection of energy efficient buildings, renewable energy, and climate change resilience.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, June 14th, 2016. 

 

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Not Yet the End of the World

BY SUMMER GRAY
@ VOL 10 ON JAN 30, 2014

Summer Gray is a Ph.D. student in Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Research Associate at the International Institute of Climate Action and Theory. She speaks on the climate justice movement, and what we must do to save the planet from the destruction of global warming. 

"Presentation of the Day" on April 5, 2014.

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Projection: Earth in 2100

BY MATTHEW BROWN
@ VOL 2 ON OCT 10, 2013

Professor Matthew Brown gives us a hard look at facts of where Earth is headed in the next 100 years. 

"Presentation of the Day" on January 21, 2015.

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Aviation x Weather

BY ARIF MUNANDAR
@ VOL 23 ON SEP 16, 2015

Weather observing, reporting, and procedure are elements that are most important for aircraft operations. Take a sneak peek on how they actually work through the presentation by Arif Munandar.

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The Smarter Cities Partnership: Reimagining Knoxville’s Energy Future

BY ERIN GILL
@ VOL 17 ON NOV 12, 2015

Erin Gill focuses on Smarter Cities Partnership efforts to dramatically advance energy efficiency in Knoxville through community engagement, education, and weatherization. 

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University of Tennessee Governor's Chair for Energy and Urbanism

BY JAMES ROSE
@ VOL 19 ON MAY 12, 2016

What can we do together that we can't do individually? This is the
question that serves to unite the efforts of UT College of Architecture
and Design, Skidmore Owings and Merrill, and ORNL as partners in
the Governor's Chair for Energy and Urbanism. Based in the
downtown FabLab and taught in conjunction with Phil Enquist and
others from SOM and ORNL, the Governor's Chair studios challenge
students to tackle tough design problems. One such challenge is the
architectural application of additive manufacturing or 3D printing. In
the spring of 2015 a graduate architecture studio was tasked with
developing an understanding of the opportunities and limitations of
this new technology. These findings foregrounded the design and
construction of the AMIE prototype. More akin to natural processes
like seashell growth than familiar construction, the process of
designing and building AMIE has created a platform for global
leadership in this emerging field for UT, SOM, and ORNL.

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Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78

BY FRANK PALEN, ESQ., AICP
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

“Think of me as a time traveler. I’m going to take you back to a place called Buffalo in the 1970s.”

In Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78 from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, attorney and urban renewal advocate, Frank Palen, recalls the creation of a historic district for theatre and culture from a once abandoned rust belt urban core. From 1977 to 1979, Palen was Research Associate in the Center for Community Research and Development at the University at Buffalo’s School of Architecture and Environmental Design, serving as Coordinator of the Buffalo Entertainment District Project. The University at Buffalo’s graduate studio investigated the potential of promoting a theater district in what was then an increasingly abandoned section of Downtown, despite various setbacks and a challenging political climate. The result was a very high-profile effort that set an agenda for the redevelopment of Buffalo that continues today.

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Rethinking Resettlement

BY ERKIN ÖZAY
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"How can we make our endeavors clear and approachable enough that we can actually contribute to the public debate at a very high level?"

In Rethinking Resettlement from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University at Buffalo, Erkin Özay, reviews some of the social and design issues involved in rehousing and supporting Buffalo, New York's new Americans. Özay's Spring 2016 UB graduate studio explored the potential for temporary and long-term housing for newly arrived refugees and immigrants, as well as the role of supporting institutions, community assets, and reimagining the existing housing stock. Özay's project investigates "compassionate urbanism." He is interested in how groups of limited means--new and existing residents--support each other through careful intersections. 

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The Seneca-Salamanca Leasehold Study

BY BRADSHAW HOVEY, PH.D.
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"They wanted to infuse architecture with research and they proposed to build a pedagogical process around project work."

In The Seneca-Salamanca Leasehold Study from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Research Associate Professor 
at the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, Bradshaw Hovey, Ph.D., recounts how one of the great student research projects from the school's 50-year history was devised by the school's founding leadership. One of the very first projects to engage UB students was a paid commission for the Seneca Nation of Indians to advise them on negotiations for a new lease between the nation and the residents of the City of Salamanca, NY whose homes sat on Seneca land. That such a project would be undertaken by architecture students was a signal about how expansively the founders of the school conceived of its professional domain.

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Buffalo Niagara by Design

BY ROBERT G. SHIBLEY
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"What was I thinking when I came to Buffalo? ... I was coming to join a social movement in our city and region, and I dove in head first."

In Buffalo Niagara Design from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Dean and Professor of the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, Robert Shibley, recounts his recruitment to Buffalo as Department Chair, 35 years ago. Upon the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the department, Shibley discusses his work with architecture and planning students, faculty and community members on various urban planning projects in the region. Across an arc of a quarter century, the UB Urban Design Project and the UB Regional Institute have been key players in the evolution of a broad regional planning framework.