PechaKucha Presentation

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Nicholas Rajkovich

Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning in Buffalo

"How do we start thinking about heat waves and why are heat waves so important?"

In How One Man on a 75-Pound Bicycle Took a City's Temperature from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Professor, Nicholas B. Rajkovich describes the design of a bicycle-based weather station used to find the “hot spots” of Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Every year in the United States, more people die from heat waves than any other type of natural disaster. Extreme heat events are expected to increase in the future due to climate change. Collecting a fine scale of microclimatic data can help to determine how physical characteristics contribute to human exposure to ground and air temperatures. These data also suggest how urban design strategies can reduce the impacts of the urban heat island effect. However, microclimate measurement poses substantial challenges. Rajkovich’s work investigates the intersection of energy efficient buildings, renewable energy, and climate change resilience.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, June 14th, 2016. 

 

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