PechaKucha Presentation

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016.

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Bikes Tackling Environmental, Social & Economic Challenges

BY ANNE BEDOS
@ VOL 8 ON JUL 22, 2015

Anne Bedos is the founder and manager of Rothar. Rothar uses bikes to tackle environmental, social & economic challenges in Dublin. It creates local solutions to global issues through the promotion of sustainable urban transport with cycling. The creation of employment and training opportunities for marginalised individuals is central to the enterprise.

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The Beginning of Memory

BY MIGUEL GUITART, PH.D.
@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

"The story of Buffalo is inextricably linked to the notion of memory. That memory is now in Danger."

In The Beginning of Memory from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 14, Spanish architect and academic Miguel Guitart remembers the importance of Buffalo's signature past and visual legacy that has made the city unique, and compels the audience to slow down enough to observe it for themselves, together on a quest to find it's soul once more. In this beautiful poetic performance, he shares a series of ephemeral photos of the city, titled "Americana" with music by Philippe Rombi and excerpts of Laurie Anderson's "The Beginning of Memory", illustrating that despite PechaKucha's fixed format, presentations can take all forms.  

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 2nd, 2015. 

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Realizing Good Ideas

BY CHRISTOPHER SIANO
@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

"It's not enough to have a good idea. To realize that good idea is very difficult, and that's what I work hard to do".

In Realizing Good Ideas from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 14Chris Siano shares how he uses digital design and fabricatio to make things better, whether it is a public art installation, a student sculpture project, a building or a neighborhood. For the past twelve years he has served as an Instructional Support Technician in the University at Buffalo Department of Art. In 2005 he formed The Foundry Group Inc. - a company specializing in art and architectural fabrication. And in 2012, in partnership with his brother Matthew, he formed HES Properties - a real estate development company focusing on development of mixed-use properties on Buffalo's West Side. All of these endevours are conduits for great ideas in his community to come to fruition. 

Cover image: Fabricated by Chris Siano and The Foundry Group, Inc., 2015 for the Albright-Knox Art Gallery: Jene Highstein's Black Mound (Turtle).

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Thursday, January 7th, 2016.

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20 Months

BY ANTONINA SIMETI
@ VOL 15 ON FEB 04, 2016

"As newcomers in a city we should step back, clear our minds and look for clues. What do we see? What can't we see?"

In 20 Months from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 15, urbanist Antonina Simeti reads excerpts from her diary of experiences and perspectives drawn from the past 20 months living in Amsterdam, Berlin and Buffalo. Through everyday observations of the physical realm, Antonina tries to uncover and understand how cultural, political and economic values and systems are expressed in our cities. 

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The Belt Line: Hiding in Plain Sight

BY CHRIS HAWLEY
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"The Belt Line … will be the next phase in Buffalo’s sustainable development."

In The Belt Line: Hiding in Plain Sight from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 16, urbanist and preservationist, Chris Hawley, presents the Belt Line -- one of the most conspicuous and least-known features of Buffalo, NY. Each day, trains go by along it and people drive underneath and over it. It is the "third strand" in Buffalo's DNA, as important to the city's physical and economic geography as Joseph Ellicott's radial and grid plan and Frederick Law Olmsted's park and parkway system; as consequential to the city's development as the Erie Canal and Interstate Highway System.

The Belt Line was opened in 1883, with segments dating back to 1836. The rail line is 15 miles long, forming a continuous loop through Buffalo╩╝s downtown as well as the prominent industrial loft clusters that it helped to create. Today, the Belt Line's 12 million square feet of largely vacant or underutilized industrial space is the city's next frontier for sustainable development. Factory buildings are being recycled as mixed-use developments. These former industrial areas are becoming walkable centers again.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, July 27th, 2016. 

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How One Man on a 75-Pound Bicycle Took a City's Temperature

BY NICHOLAS RAJKOVICH
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"How do we start thinking about heat waves and why are heat waves so important?"

In How One Man on a 75-Pound Bicycle Took a City's Temperature from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Professor, Nicholas B. Rajkovich describes the design of a bicycle-based weather station used to find the “hot spots” of Cuyahoga County, Ohio. Every year in the United States, more people die from heat waves than any other type of natural disaster. Extreme heat events are expected to increase in the future due to climate change. Collecting a fine scale of microclimatic data can help to determine how physical characteristics contribute to human exposure to ground and air temperatures. These data also suggest how urban design strategies can reduce the impacts of the urban heat island effect. However, microclimate measurement poses substantial challenges. Rajkovich’s work investigates the intersection of energy efficient buildings, renewable energy, and climate change resilience.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Tuesday, June 14th, 2016. 

 

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A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects

BY ANG LI
@ VOL 16 ON APR 14, 2016

"A wall and a column...what they have in common is an interest in looking at the cultural agency of traditional building materials and their ability to speak."

In A Wall and A Column: 2 Projects from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 16, architect and University at Buffalo Peter Reyner Banham Fellow and Visiting Assistant Professor Ang Li presents a pair of site specific installations that explore the cultural agency of vernacular building materials. Horror Vacui is an installation in Lisbon, Portugal that examines the ability of building facades to “speak” through the medium of the Portuguese “azulejo” - hand-painted ceramic tiles often depicting scenes from historic or civic events. The piece explores the narrative potential of bricks and mortar within contemporary image sharing and crowdsourcing platforms. No Frills is an installation in Buffalo, New York that stems out of an interest in the industrialized production of terracotta in the 19th century as a new kind of ornamental language. In a semi-abandoned Chevrolet Factory by the architect Albert Kahn, a 13-foot column interrupts the existing grid of the assembly floor,  acting as a bridge between the vast scale of obsolete industry and the human scale of the architectural ornament.

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Foraging and Picking

BY BRIAN CARTER
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"Architects are hunters and gatherers." 

In "Foraging and Picking" from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 17, professor of architecture Brian Carter provides a retrospective of twenty postcards from his many travels, highlighting what each image signifies in the mind of an architect. Carter reminds us that architecture can be an international language. It prompts travel, causing us walk into buildings, to meet people, and to listen, sense and smell the places that we go. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Monday, November 21st, 2016. 

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The Story of Buffalo BookBike

BY AMY OZAY
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

“We need to bring the fun back to reading, and rolling up with a book bike might be a way to do that.” 

In The Story of Buffalo BookBike from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Founder of Buffalo BookBike in Buffalo, NY, Amy Ozay, talks about her love of Buffalo, books, and bikes. Taking inspiration from similar programs in other cities, she launched Buffalo BookBike in 2015, which gives free books to the children of Buffalo in parks and playgrounds throughout the summer months. The BookBike has given away over 1,000 books to date, with the hopes of slowing down the summer slide. Her dream is to increase the reach of the BookBike, foster more collaboration between local literacy organizations, and help convert Buffalo parks to open air libraries in the future. As Cicero wrote, “A room without books is like a body without a soul.”