PechaKucha Presentation

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Beth Tauke

Associate Professor, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning in Buffalo

"These kids have big ideas and only through making do those ideas come alive."

In Architecture + Education from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Associate Professor at the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, Beth Tauke, joined by graduate student Randy Fernando, we learn about the Architecture + Education program. This initiative of the Buffalo Architecture Foundation and the University at Buffalo earned the 2013 AIA Diversity Recognition Program award for introducing thousands of grade-schoolers to architecture over the past 13 years. Faculty and students work with practitioners in the Buffalo Public School system to introduce students to the idea of architecture, concepts in the practice, and career possibilities. The program's motto, adapted from Dr. Seuss, is true to its mission: "Think LEFT & think RIGHT & think LOW & think HIGH. Oh, the things you can come up with if only you try!"

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Out of Plane

BY DANIEL VRANA
@ VOL 14 ON NOV 17, 2015

Daniel Vrana
Adjunct Researcher, 
Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, University at Buffalo
 
The research presented in Daniel Vrana's Out of Plane examines the potential for kinetic expanding geometries to be used as a means of rationalization for complex curvature. Utilizing origami assemblies, a technique of manipulating internal forces acting on individual units is used rather than controlling the system’s form externally, inducing small shifts that inform the larger, global form changes that are able to occur.  
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Foraging and Picking

BY BRIAN CARTER
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"Architects are hunters and gatherers." 

In "Foraging and Picking" from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 17, professor of architecture Brian Carter provides a retrospective of twenty postcards from his many travels, highlighting what each image signifies in the mind of an architect. Carter reminds us that architecture can be an international language. It prompts travel, causing us walk into buildings, to meet people, and to listen, sense and smell the places that we go. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Monday, November 21st, 2016. 

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The Story of Buffalo BookBike

BY AMY OZAY
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

“We need to bring the fun back to reading, and rolling up with a book bike might be a way to do that.” 

In The Story of Buffalo BookBike from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Founder of Buffalo BookBike in Buffalo, NY, Amy Ozay, talks about her love of Buffalo, books, and bikes. Taking inspiration from similar programs in other cities, she launched Buffalo BookBike in 2015, which gives free books to the children of Buffalo in parks and playgrounds throughout the summer months. The BookBike has given away over 1,000 books to date, with the hopes of slowing down the summer slide. Her dream is to increase the reach of the BookBike, foster more collaboration between local literacy organizations, and help convert Buffalo parks to open air libraries in the future. As Cicero wrote, “A room without books is like a body without a soul.” 

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Collage City

BY JEAN-MICHEL REED
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, December 14th, 2016.

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Architecture Learning Network

BY SAMANTHA WEAVER
@ VOL 25 ON OCT 06, 2016

Samantha Weaver talks about the new Architecture Learning Network (ALN) which offers support for students in architecture education programs, as they become active, thoughtful citizens in their communities. The design process can get messy, but it’s beautiful.

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Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78

BY FRANK PALEN, ESQ., AICP
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

“Think of me as a time traveler. I’m going to take you back to a place called Buffalo in the 1970s.”

In Buffalo Entertainment District Project, 1977-78 from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, attorney and urban renewal advocate, Frank Palen, recalls the creation of a historic district for theatre and culture from a once abandoned rust belt urban core. From 1977 to 1979, Palen was Research Associate in the Center for Community Research and Development at the University at Buffalo’s School of Architecture and Environmental Design, serving as Coordinator of the Buffalo Entertainment District Project. The University at Buffalo’s graduate studio investigated the potential of promoting a theater district in what was then an increasingly abandoned section of Downtown, despite various setbacks and a challenging political climate. The result was a very high-profile effort that set an agenda for the redevelopment of Buffalo that continues today.

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Universal Design

BY EDWARD STEINFELD, ARCH. D., AIA
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"It is a design process that enables and empowers a diverse population by improving human performance, health and wellness, and social participation."

In Universal Design from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, SUNY Distinguished Professor and Director of the IDeA Center in Buffalo, NY, Edward Steinfeld, ArchD, AIA, provides an overview of how the built environment affects access. The University at Buffalo's Center for Inclusive Design and Environmental Access (IDeA Center) is dedicated to making environments and products more usable, safer and healthier in response to the needs of an increasingly diverse population. The IDeA Center’s activities are based on the philosophy of Inclusive Design, often called “Universal Design” or “Design for All.” It is a way of thinking that can be applied in any design activity, business practice, program or service involving interaction of people with the physical, social or virtual worlds.

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The Seneca-Salamanca Leasehold Study

BY BRADSHAW HOVEY, PH.D.
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"They wanted to infuse architecture with research and they proposed to build a pedagogical process around project work."

In The Seneca-Salamanca Leasehold Study from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Research Associate Professor 
at the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, Bradshaw Hovey, Ph.D., recounts how one of the great student research projects from the school's 50-year history was devised by the school's founding leadership. One of the very first projects to engage UB students was a paid commission for the Seneca Nation of Indians to advise them on negotiations for a new lease between the nation and the residents of the City of Salamanca, NY whose homes sat on Seneca land. That such a project would be undertaken by architecture students was a signal about how expansively the founders of the school conceived of its professional domain.

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Buffalo Niagara by Design

BY ROBERT G. SHIBLEY
@ VOL 18 ON SEP 24, 2016

"What was I thinking when I came to Buffalo? ... I was coming to join a social movement in our city and region, and I dove in head first."

In Buffalo Niagara Design from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 18, Dean and Professor of the University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning, Robert Shibley, recounts his recruitment to Buffalo as Department Chair, 35 years ago. Upon the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the department, Shibley discusses his work with architecture and planning students, faculty and community members on various urban planning projects in the region. Across an arc of a quarter century, the UB Urban Design Project and the UB Regional Institute have been key players in the evolution of a broad regional planning framework.