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We haven’t scheduled our next PechaKucha Night yet, but in the meantime you can watch some presentations, look at our map to see if there are any scheduled PKNs in nearby cities, or have a look at the long list of upcoming events, to see if there’s one you can attend!

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Featured Presentation

"An architect, it seems, has to be an optimist and idealist. That by building we're somehow making the world a better place. But before you need buildings, you need people."

In Collage City from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, artist, designer, realtor and retired paramedic, Jean-Michel Reed, shares stories and perceptions of Buffalo, New York as an intimate outsider. Reed moved to Buffalo in 1992, working first as a paramedic, and later transitioning to both a designer and a realtor as the city attempted an about face. Cites are made first of people, and then within those individual people, of experiences. It is this combination of convergent and divergent experiences that construct the sociological makeup of place and city, which, in turn manufactures the physical landscape. 

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Complicating Things: Experimenting with Authority

BY PAUL VANOUSE
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

“I’m a bio media artist. And what that means is I work self-reflexively, with the tools and technologies of the life sciences.” 

In Complicating Things: Experimenting with Authority from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Professor of Art at the University at Buffalo, Paul Vanouse, provides an overview of his work as a bio media artist. As Director of the newly created Coalesce Center for Biological Art at the University at Buffalo, Vanouse works with artists and philosophers and people who wouldn’t normally have a direct connection to do create work in a life sciences laboratory, and is actively engaged with Coalesce’s artist residency program. Vanouse’s own work has recently focused on DNA fingerprinting, removing the inherent layers of authority from DNA with an interest in the very visual representation of DNA. His recent projects, Latent Figure Protocol and Ocular Revision use molecular biology techniques to challenge “genome-hype” and to confront issues surrounding DNA fingerprinting. 

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Site-Based Performance: Development of a Process

BY DAN SHANAHAN
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

“We devised a few rules: Start with the architecture. Consider its history. Draw from its mythology.”

In "Site-Based Performance: Development of a Process" from PechaKucha Buffalo Vol. 17, Artistic Director and Co-Founder of Torn Space Theatre in Buffalo, NY, Dan Shanahan, reveals Torn Space's process of developing site-based performance. Drawing from over 10 years of experience and eight original pieces for non-traditional performance venues, Shanahan addresses the influences, aesthetics, and rules for Torn Space's site-based performances.

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The Story of Buffalo BookBike

BY AMY OZAY
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

“We need to bring the fun back to reading, and rolling up with a book bike might be a way to do that.” 

In The Story of Buffalo BookBike from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Founder of Buffalo BookBike in Buffalo, NY, Amy Ozay, talks about her love of Buffalo, books, and bikes. Taking inspiration from similar programs in other cities, she launched Buffalo BookBike in 2015, which gives free books to the children of Buffalo in parks and playgrounds throughout the summer months. The BookBike has given away over 1,000 books to date, with the hopes of slowing down the summer slide. Her dream is to increase the reach of the BookBike, foster more collaboration between local literacy organizations, and help convert Buffalo parks to open air libraries in the future. As Cicero wrote, “A room without books is like a body without a soul.” 

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The De-Institution: Or. How to Make A Contemporary Arts Space with no Capital, Networks or Cred

BY DANA MCKNIGHT
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"Number 1. Be an ornery artist. You're mad. You went to art school. You go to shows in basements and living rooms. You are the poster child of the scurvy-laced bohemia. Your parents can't pay your rent."

In The De-Institution: Or. How to Make A Contemporary Arts Space with no Capital, Networks or Cred from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, artist and founder of Dreamland Art Gallery in Buffalo, NY, Dana Mcknight, illustrates twenty steps to carving out a cutting-edge, artist-run space outside of the dominant, institutional realm. Mcknight cautions, "To be an institution is to own-- ­­­to place value on possession rather than action. To fixate on conservative contentment rather than Hope and Possibility. Artist-led spaces fizzle out all the time. Let us not leave behind the phoenix eggs to merely touch a tusk in the Elephant graveyard." 

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Ceramic Assemblies

BY LIMINAL PROJECTS (OMAR KAHN AND LAURA GARÓFALO)
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"Ask a ceramicist and they will insist that the material lives."

In Ceramic Assemblies from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Laura Garófalo and Omar Kahn of Liminal Projects discuss their prototypes for ceramic building systems that were developed at the European Ceramics Workcentre (ekwc), in Oisterwijk, the Netherlands. They are designs that explore ways that architecture can mediate heat, water and nature. Ceramics, which are fired clay, are one of the oldest building materials. But they defy easy categorization because their behavior and properties are so diverse. Ceramics were used to build the Roman aqueducts and also used for the heat shield on the Space Shuttle. Ask a ceramicist and they will insist that the material lives. It is this quality that Garófalo and Kahn want to capture and perpetuate in their work.

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Return of the Master Builder

BY MATTHEW HUME
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"I tell people I wear two hats—one of the designer and one of the builder, but as I evolve I wish to wear one hat, that of the Master Builder."

In the Return of the Master Builder from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17Adjunct Assistant Professor, University at Buffalo School of Architecture and Planning and Owner/Principle of HUME PROJECTS, LLC, Matthew Hume discusses his work creating residential and commercial projects, from the design phase through the construction phase. The traditional Master Builder once integrated both design and construction processes by direct involvement. The profession of architecture and processes of building are shifting back toward a more integrated approach forcing architects to re-evolve into earlier versions of themselves. Hume's recent work in design and construction projects serves as an example of this paradigm shift.

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A Brief Memoir of Architectural Space

BY JOANNA GILLESPIE
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"This is my 6-minute memoir. A mediation on impermanence."

In A Brief Memoir of Architecural Space from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, independent arts consultant and co-organizer of PechaKucha Buffalo, Joanna Gillespie, delivers a meditation on twenty of the fifty places she has lived since birth. From Victorian-era structures in Buffalo, NY and San Francisco, CA, to the wilds of the 1970's California coast, to modern and efficient rural Japan, to a Postmodern art utopia in Maine, and beyond, Gillespie recounts a particular memory from each space. Through all of the temporal landscapes we find ourselves in, Gillespie concludes, "We forge on, either clumsily or assuredly. We keep on keeping on." Even if we move fifty times.

This was "PechaKucha of the Day" on Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016. 

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Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975

BY CHARLES L. DAVIS, II, PH.D.
@ VOL 17 ON SEP 15, 2016

"We started with several books that looked at the brownstone as a site of intervention."

In Building Black Utopias: Modeling the Architectural Principles of African American Literature, 1960-1975 from PechaKucha Buffalo vol. 17, Charles L. Davis, II, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, shows works from his recent exhibition project, Building Black Utopias, and discusses the literature that served as inspiration. 

The Building Black Utopias project combines the tools of the architect, the historian and the literary critic to recover the historical contributions of African American writers to architectural utopian thought. It specifically examines the role of literary depictions of place in June Jordan, Amiri Baraka, Paule Marshall and Angela Davis’ writings. Davis argues that each authors’ rhetorical manipulations of the built environment operates on the same level as architectural utopian thought insofar as both mediums created rich, alternative depictions of modernist space to liberate the architect’s imagination. The final exhibit translates the spatial ideas of literature into drawings, models and other ephemera.

 

BUFFALO Blog

Foraging and Picking

"Architects are hunters and gatherers." 
In "Foraging and Picking" from PechaKucha Night Buffalo Vol. 17, professor of architecture Brian Carter provides a retrospective of twenty postcards from his many travels, highlighting what each image signifies in the mind of an architect. Carter reminds us that architecture can be an international language. It prompts travel, causing us walk into buildings, to meet people, and to listen, sense and smell the places that we go. 

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About the City's Organizers

  • Nick Bruscia

    Nicholas Bruscia’s current teaching and research experiment with form and structure via computational simulation and material prototyping. Since 2012, he has been co-directing research toward lightweight, thin-gauge sheet metal structures, focusing on the digital workflow associated with the design and realization of large-scale prototypes. The work has been made possible through close collaboration with local manufacturers in an ongoing attempt to bridge academic research with long-practiced material expertise. While in Tokyo, Nick directs a summer study abroad program leading an in-situ studio that seeks to propose ‘adaptive metrics’ as flexible alternatives to documenting and measuring the city’s complex and ever-changing urban context.

  • Joanna Gillespie

    Co-organizer of PechaKucha Buffalo since 2010, Joanna Gillespie is an arts management consultant, most recently serving as Special Projects Director of CEPA Gallery / Big Orbit Gallery in Buffalo, NY. Previously, Joanna served as Director of Development and Vice President of Hallwalls Contemporary Arts Center. She developed an extensive knowledge of the art world through consulting for private art collections for over ten years, and through managing many Buffalo-based art projects. Joanna attended Allegheny College and the University at Buffalo, later teaching Art History at the University at Buffalo, Buffalo State College, Canisius College and Nichols School before beginning an independent consultancy. Photography by David Moog / Courtesy Burchfield Penney Art Gallery