PECHAKUCHA DAILY BLOG

PECHAKUCHA DAILY BLOG Posts

Creativity United


"Embrace your weirdness! The weirder the better, I'd say."

Hear Senior Lecturer in Graphic Design at Manchester Metropolitan, Graham Jones from Manchester's Loose Collective, as he talks about his work, imposter syndrome and Star Wars Lego in Lessons from Loose Collective from PechaKucha Night Manchester Vol. 16

20 Way PechaKucha Made a Difference in 2016



2016 was another amazingly positive year for PechaKucha in the 958 cities we touch around the world, a completely different year to the one portrayed by the media. The world we saw was dominated by true creativity, positivity, passion and real life. Check out 20 ways PechaKucha made the world a better place in 2016. Here's to making 2017 another year that will make a difference.



You may recall that here in Tokyo at our recent PechaKucha Night Vol. 135, as part of our PechaKucha Inspire Initiative, we were joined via live video feed, by our PKN organizers from Kumamoto, Japan, and Quito, Ecuador, both regions devastated by a series of recent earthquakes. Check our their incredibly moving presentations on our PechaKucha Inspire Channel.
 
Francisco in Quito followed up with PechaKucha HQ week to update us on the situations there. As architects, they had responded immediately to the disaster with an ingenuitive temporary shelter design with recycled and readily sourced local materials such as bamboo that would address the affected community's immediate needs.
 
Frustrated with a lack of support and resources from local government and authorities to develop their ideas, their project has been delayed but not their perseverance or determination to help. They've changed gears for the moment, teaming up with Project AMOR 7.8 (Love 7.8), an initiative focused to help orphans that were left with nothing after the earthquake. They hope to design and construct sustainable community developments and facilities for the children and a the community most affected by the disaster.
 
They need the support of the PechaKucha Global Network so please have a look at their campaign and consider helping them reach their fundraising goals and be a part of their recovery.



PKN Tokyo aims for a special night. We will be connecting LIVE with our PechaKucha teams from Kumamoto and Ecuador for two presentations. Both cities are struggling in the wake of powerful earthquakes and, technology permitting, each city will present LIVE about the current situation, and what we can do help. 


“We gave out over 1000 albums and 10,000 portraits. We’ve involved 300 volunteers and 1000+ supporters. ”

Featuring again, Photohoku 2.0, An update from the 2013 PechaKucha Inspire presentation, Brian Scott Peterson and Yuko Yoshikawa go into depth on their Photohoku project. This photographic movement was founded in response to the giant earthquake that shook Japan in 2011. It's now a movement whereby photographers take photos of families affected by disasters, and give the photo albums back to the families themselves. It has grown into a global photo-giving, fundraising movement and has spread to the US, the Philippines, Australia, Korea, and many more.


“When the Haiti earthquake struck, we ran an event around the world on 24 hour skype. A Year later, the shoe was on the other foot; the earthquake happened in Japan. 105 cities got together within 3 weeks and we held an Inspire Japan Event.”

From PKN Tokyo’s recent "Powered by PechaKucha: Tohoku 2020: Building a sustainable Post-3/11 Future" Speaker and PechaKucha founder Mark Dytham presents "The Tohoku Effect" on PechaKucha’s and PechaKucha Inspire’s history. No one could have predicted that the small one-off event would balloon into a popular presentation format to be used the world over. PechaKucha Certainly has its perks; It’s free, It’s simple, it lets people give their work exposure. Most importantly of all, it builds community. It is such communities that come together when tragedies strike and help build warm spaces.

Harnessing the Power of Play


“Bureaucracy is not very fun, so… at first they decided to turn a blind eye towards what we were doing. [Eventually] the government’s blind eye [realized that it] liked what we were doing. The ministry of education started reaching out to us and asking ‘hey, can you help us rebuild the playgrounds at our schools’”

From PechaKucha Night Tokyo’s recent "Powered by PechaKucha: Tohoku 2020: Building a sustainable Post-3/11 Future" comes Harnessing the Power of Play by Michael Anop. Whilst volunteering in disaster-affected Tohoku communities, Anop came to realize that many parks and school playgrounds had been destroyed by the 3/11 tsunami. Because local government was simply overwhelmed by the scale of the disaster, repairing parks would take 3 to 5 years. Working together with corporate sponsors, community leaders and city halls, Playground of Hope has built 43 playground in Tohoku.

Inspire Japan



Five years on after the events of 3/11 in Japan, and the worldwide PechaKucha community is still coming together to "Inspire Japan." The process of re-growth is ongoing, and presentations continue to be added. PK aims to keep the spotlight on this initiative where we have collected 100’s of presentation to Inspire Japan back to it vibrant self. Check out the channel here.


"It's a little bit like Google Street View, it's the same idea ...with radiation."

From PKN Tokyo’s recent "Powered by PechaKucha: Tohoku 2020: Building a sustainable Post-3/11 Future" Pieter Franken Presents Safecast: Real-time Hyper-local Information. In our technologically saturated age, it is hypothetically easy to share data instantaneously with others. After the Tohoku Earthquake, Pieter and what would eventually become the Safecast.org Team realized that information about the radiation levels couldn’t be spread as it didin’t exist. After connecting to minds, companies, and volunteers – both in Japan and abroad– an open-source system was developed that could quickly collect, record, and share radiation level information.




This week we put the PechaKucha Focus on Tohoku, the earthquake and tsunami effected region of northeastern Japan, and specifically on a rebuilding project deserves highlighting - renowned Architect Toyo Ito's Home-for-All NPO initiative. Thus far, his collective of architects have built 14 community centers, across the region, pro-bono, and with whole-heartedness and imagination, including this one in Soma by PechaKucha Founders, Klein Dytham Architecture.

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