PECHAKUCHA DAILY BLOG

PECHAKUCHA DAILY BLOG Posts




"This is a personal rebuttal of the notion that nothing ever happens in Whanganui."

In Nothing to See Here from Whanganui Vol. 1., Matt Dutton highlights many works from any of the talented artists living in an unsuspecting New Zealand community on the North Island. Considered a place where "nothing ever happens", Dutton challenges us not to overlook the quiet town, or the contemporary, often abstract works coming from any of its highly gifted artists. 

Enjoy!

"We wanted to make the world's largest crochetted blanket."

In All the World's a Square, from TokyoVol. 124, repeat PechaKucha Presenter, and Yokohama Knit Artist, Bernd Kestler started an initiative called "Knit for Japan" in response to the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami of 2011. Originally aimed at providing knitting supplies for people of Tohoku, the project evolved into the "Granny Square Project” in which Bernd collected 20cm X 20cm knitted squares from all around the world. Little did he know he would receive so many that he was able to create the world's largest crocheted blanket. 

Check out how this creative project became greater than the sum of all its parts. 





"I realised that really I just want everything to be fun ...all the time."

In Turn Off To Tune In from New Orleans, Vol. 13, Artist, animator, Gallery Assistant at The Foundation Gallery in New Orleans, Alice McGillicuddy, talks about her process to find fun and to get into the mind frame to create.  Alice is the happiest creating structures, large and small, to house animations and enjoys making every sort of bit and bob.

After you watch this fun presentation, be inspired to DO!



"...because sometimes I think the picture isn't ready yet."

In A Brief History of Polyptych Art, from Maastricht Vol. 26Said ten Brinke explores the idea of Polyptich Art, the use of two, three, or more works of art to create a multiple array that becomes a unique piece itself, often with a new context.

Some of the oldest known works of the Late Roman Empire are diptychs, a form that continued through the Renaissance and on to today in modern art by artistis such as Andy Warhol and Francis Bacon. Said ten Brinke ends his presentation with a series of self created photo-polyptychs. Check it out!





"The last important Ukio-e print master and the first print artist of modern Japan."

In The First Print Artist of Modern Japan from Nishinomiya Vol. 24, John Szostak shares his admiration and insights into the work of Japanese artist Kobayashi Kiyochika. As Japan transitioned from its fuedal history and isolated past just over a centruy ago, opening its shores to the world, Kobayashi Kiyochika helped to usher Japan into a new age of art and print. He challenged the idea of the traditional Japanese print, updating it by integrating many of the artistic sensibilities found in western modern prints, painting, and photography.


Be ready to be amazed.

What is the simplest vessel — that you can send out into the world — to contain your passion?

Lindsay Muscato is guessing that it's been a while since you've written a letter, but that's alright, leave it to her to write one for you! In “The Tiniest Best Boat” from PKN Chicago Vol. 33, we see that Lindsay has written hundreds of letters for strangers on typewriters, and has discovered something really special about herself through it all — find out just what that is!

"I stared at that pen for 9 months too scared to use it, thinking I would make a complete mess, terrified I might not be able to deliver on my ideal."

Inspired by called "Calligrafitti," student of lettering Andy Kelly, took on the the challenge of picking up the parallel pen and sees where in takes him in this emotional presentation: "What I Have Learnt from Learning Calligraphy" from PKN St. Neots Vol. 1. Andy talks us through the process of learning the art of calligraphy, and the transformative effects it's had on him. Check out more of Andy's amazing work on his blog

"We have talent in our city but there was no platform, so PechaKucha is the platform for the people of Aden."

PechaKucha Night Aden organisers Heba Faheem and Elyas Khan speak on the efforts expended getting their event going in Yemen, and the profound effects it has had on their community. In "A Platform for Aden" from PKN Tokyo Vol. 123, we see that though their country is riddled with political and military strife, they have shown that PechaKucha brings out the very best in their city.

“People who don’t close up their lowercase G’s are very bad at keeping secrets.”

Graphic artist Sarah Maxey loves her fountain pens. In “A Loveletter to the Fountain Pen” from PKN Whanganui Vol. 1, Sarah speaks on her growth as a hand-lettering artist, her deep connection to the tools of her trade, and the way she’s anthropomorphized her vast collection.

“I’m interested in the new spaces we’re forced to inhabit after disasters.”

Artist Victoria Buck is interested in the conflicting concepts of protection, vulnerability, and hope in the time during and following abrupt natural disasters.

In “Memory of Place” from PKN Knoxville Vol. 14, she discusses her work, and how it’s intended to investigate the naive trust we place upon the shelter systems we have in place, and their supposed ability to protect us.

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